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HWF at Earth Day Festival in Burnaby, BC

Wildlife News

 

Here's a few pictures from the Earth Day festival in Burnaby, BC last Sunday. HWF had an exhibit there again this year. Thanks to our volunteers who came out to help David Hancock and me man our booth. Photos are by Paul Steeves, of the Wildlife Rescue Assn. in Burnaby, who is the host of the annual event.
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Where eagles dare not fly: Waterloo looms as wind farms power town revolt

Wildlife News

 

 
Kym Dixon, Waterloo Wind turbines

Black Springs farmer Kym Dixon next to a dead wedge-tailed eagle, which was found 180m from wind turbines in the South Australian town of Waterloo. Picture: Vanessa Hunter Source: The Australian

A DEAD wedge-tailed eagle, chicken eggs without yolks and a dysfunctional village with residents bursting to flee. This is the clean-energy revolution Waterloo-style, where the nation's biggest wind turbines have whipped up a storm of dissent.

Adelaide University has been drawn into a controversy that threatens to spin out of control after one of its masters students asked residents of Waterloo, 120km north of Adelaide, what they really thought about living near windmills and was knocked over in an avalanche of complaint.

Read the whole article here

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David Hancock to Appear on Studio 4

Wildlife News

David Hancock will once again be a guest on Fanny Kiefer's show, Studio 4, this Wednesday, April 25, at 9 a.m.  If you are not a local resident that gets Shaw TV Channel 4, then you can watch the show online at a later date.  Here's the web site for Studio 4.

http://www.studio4.ca/

 

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Richard's Spirit Will Soar over Vancouver

Wildlife News

FROM MARTIN PASSCHIER:
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Bald eagle in crosshairs of US fight over lead bullets

Wildlife News

 

The bald eagle that came into wildlife rehabilitator Belinda Burwell's care last month, just as the hunting season was coming to a close in North America, was a shadow of its former self.


The stiff and wobbly bird clung to life but showed distinct signs of lead poisoning, likely from scavenging the remains of big game left by hunters who killed their prey with lead bullets.

"She couldn't walk, couldn't fly," said Burwell. "If she tried to move, she would fall over, she would stumble."

Read the rest of the story:

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/bald-eagle-crosshairs-us-fight-over-lead-bullets-095601272.html

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Elephants in the room

The elephant in the room. It's been applied to both Cancer and Death - and then misapplied to the likes of "erectile disfunction" - but no matter what, this time we're talking about the, what I'll consider original 2 definitions: death and cancer.

We here on the Hancock Wildlife Foundation deal with death almost every day it seems, so this one should be the easier one.

Cancer, albeit the one that has had to be dragged out into social by the drug companies more, has come the farthest, is only one of many reasons for death in the animal kingdom.

Read on for my take on it and why having these topics out in the open is good for all of us, especially me, at this time.

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World's rarest ducklings Madagascan pochards hatch

Wildlife News

Eighteen Madagascan pochards - the world's most endangered duck - have hatched in a captive breeding centre.

This brings the world population of the ducks to just 60.

The Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust and Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, the groups leading the captive breeding programme, say this "builds hope that the bird can be saved from extinction".

The precious pochards are being reared at a specially built centre in Antsohihy, Madagascar.

The ducks were thought to have become extinct in the late 1990s....

Read more:

www.bbc.co.uk/nature/17616488

 

 

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Hancock Visits Vancouver Island School

Wildlife News

 

We received an email from a 6 1/2 yr. old boy whose mother wrote the email for him. She said that her son, Sam, would run to the computer every morning to watch our Sidney bald eagle cams before he went to school. Because he had learned the call sounds that bald eagles make, he recognized the same sounds when he got out of school one day. So he turned around and looked up and saw the eagle nest with both adult eagles in it at the Esquimalt Lagoon. He goes to John Stubbs Memorial in Colwood, Vancouver Island, which is near the nest. When Sam's 7th birthday approached he actually asked his friends and family to send donations to Hancock Wildlife Foundation in lieu of gifts!!! We received $250 donated on Sam's behalf. Yesterday we got an additional $240 from Sam's fellow students and the school. Two other children, Sam's sister Lauren and their friend Jasmine, had also donated birthday money!!


David accepting cards from Sam & his friend Jasmine
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Read the rest of the story and see the pictures here:

http://www.hancockwildlife.org/forum/viewtopic.php?topic=339383#339383

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