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Pearson Airport fights birds the natural way with birds

Wildlife News

 

Birds at Pearson Airport. Bird handler Rob Shevalier, of Falcon Environmental Services, trains a young gyr-peregrine at Pearson International Airport. The firm has a contract to use its birds of prey to scare off “nuisance birds,” which pose a danger to aircraft as they land and take off. David Cooper/Toronto Star

Torstar Network

October 13, 2012

Meet Ivan, an eight-year-old bald eagle that weighs about as much as a newborn human baby and manages to make a pretty good living for himself without resorting to the messy business of terminating the lives of other flying creatures.
After all, he doesn’t know how.
“He hasn’t been trained to kill,” says Rob Shevalier, 42, a bird handler by trade.
Not that it matters.
All Ivan needs to do is spread his massive black wings and fan his white tail feathers while swooping low over Etobicoke Creek and his job is pretty much done.

Read the rest of the story here: http://www.mississauga.com/community/ar ... with-birds

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Campaign Launched to Protect Rare Lowland Old-Growth Rainforest and Internationally Significant Eagle Roosting Area

Wildlife News

 


Between Mission and Agassiz, Echo Lake’s old-growth Douglas fir and redcedars are home to hundreds of roosting bald eagles during the fall salmon run. A new BC government proposal would protect some of the area but is still missing key old-growth groves.

Ancient Forest Alliance Media Release, October 11, 2012

Campaign Launched to Protect Rare Lowland Old-Growth Rainforest and Internationally Significant Eagle Roosting Area east of Vancouver
Click for larger image

AFA's Hannah Carpendale stands near a giant red cedar and Douglas-fir in the Echo Lake Ancient Forest.
Photo by TJ Watt

 


October 11, 2012

 
Campaign Launched to Protect Rare Lowland Old-Growth Rainforest and Internationally Significant Eagle Roosting Area east of Vancouver
 
Between Mission and Agassiz, Echo Lake’s old-growth Douglas fir and redcedars are home to hundreds of roosting bald eagles during the fall salmon run. A new BC government proposal would protect some of the area but is still missing key old-growth groves, with public input ending on Nov.5

 
See SPECTACULAR photos of Echo Lake’s ancient forest at:  http://www.ancientforestalliance.org/photos.php?gID=20
 
Conservationists with the Ancient Forest Alliance (AFA) have launched a new campaign to fully protect one the last endangered lowland old-growth forests left in the Lower Mainland at Echo Lake east of Mission, as part of the organization’s larger campaign to lobby the BC government for a new Provincial Old-Growth Strategy to save endangered old-growth forests across the province. The campaign to protect the Echo Lake Ancient Forest coincides with the onset of a 60 day public input period launched last month by the Ministry of Forests, ending on November 5, in regards to proposed new Old-Growth Management Areas in the Chilliwack Forest District.

 

Read the rest of the story here:  http://www.ancientforestalliance.org/news-item.php?ID=483

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Native Americans win approval from U.S. Government to use bald eagle feathers in religious ceremonies

Wildlife News

 

By Leslie Larson

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The U.S. Government announced on Friday that it will allow Native Americans a special dispensation to use bald eagle feathers for tribal religious ceremonies.

The bald eagle has been protected under a federal mandate but since it is no longer listed as an endangered species, the Department of Justice now says tribes can possess the rare feathers provided they do not sell them.

The decision comes as a victory for Native Americans, who have long held that the stringent protection of the eagle feathers was a violation of their First Amendment right to religious freedom.

 

Out of danger:

Read the rest of the story here: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... onies.html

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Province urged to protect Harrison habitat

Wildlife News

 

 

'Bald eagle capital of the world' threatened by human activity, conservationists say

 
 
 

David Hancock says he has personally counted more than 7,000 bald eagles in one day on the Harrison and Chehalis rivers - a world record and almost twice the best tally of Brack-endale Eagles Provincial Park near Squamish.

Today, as the eagles arrive again to feast on the area's annual salmon runs, Hancock is counting on the B.C. government to do the right thing and increase protection for one of the planet's great avian spectacles.

"At the moment, we don't really have any legally defined protection," said Hancock, a trustee with the American Bald Eagle Foundation and chair of the Surrey-based Hancock Wildlife Foundation.

Read the rest of the story here: 

http://www.vancouversun.com/news/metro/Province+urged+protect+Harrison+habitat/7373203/story.html

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Redding eagles return just as cameras installed

Wildlife News

 

By Damon Arthur

Originally published 10:27 a.m., October 4, 2012
Updated 06:22 p.m., October 4, 2012

Turtle Bay Exploration Park officials have installed two new cameras just in time for the return of Redding’s famous eagle pair, as the two eagles were spotted near the Sacramento River on Thursday.

Crews have been out installing the cameras and video equipment all this week and by Wednesday were already transmitting photos of the eagle nest near the Sacramento River in Redding, Turtle Bay spokesman Toby Osborn said.

Read the rest of the story here:  http://www.redding.com/news/2012/oct/04 ... ng-season/

Read our discussion forum for the Turtle Bay/Redding/CalTrans Eagles here:

http://www.hancockwildlife.org/forum/viewtopic.php?topic=419409#419409

 

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Eagle nests removed from Norfolk Botanical Garden

Wildlife News

 

NORFOLK

The popular eagle nests at Norfolk Botanical Garden are gone. 

Nuckols Tree Service Inc. removed the nests quickly this morning after climbers found they weren't as large or "intertwined" as officials believed, city spokeswoman Lori Crouch said.

The partial nest also is gone and consisted only of a couple of small branches, but officials wanted it removed because it could be a draw to eagles attracted to old nesting sites, according to a garden spokesperson.

Read the rest of this sad story here:  http://hamptonroads.com/2012/10/norfolk ... rden-today 

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Eagle nest at Norfolk Botanical Garden to be removed

Wildlife News

 

by WVEC.com

WVEC.com

Posted on August 21, 2012 at 3:51 PM

Updated Wednesday, Aug 22 at 7:02 PM

 

NORFOLK--After much debate, one of three bald eagle nests at the Norfolk Botanical Garden will be removed. 

The announcement Tuesday came after meetings that included representatives of the USDA Wildlife Services and other federal, state and local agencies.

In the end, it was recommended to the city of Norfolk, which owns the land, to remove the nests, which have been watched around the world on the live WVEC.com Eagle Cam.

Read the rest of the shameful story here: http://bit.ly/PRUXeJ

 

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Lafarge Eagle First to Return from Migration Today!!

Wildlife News

ONE OF THE LAFARGE EAGLES HAS RETURNED FROM MIGRATION.  IT CAN BE SEEN RIGHT NOW ON CAMERA HERE:

http://www.hancockwildlife.org/index.php?topic=LaFargeEagleNest#new-camera

This is our first eagle to appear in any of our cam nests since we did the cam work for the new 2012 - 2013 season.

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