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Prison for Elma man for cutting down eagle's nest

Wildlife News

 

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TACOMA, Wash. -- A timber manager who had a tree with an eagle's nest cut down in Clallam County has been sentenced in Tacoma to two months in prison.

 

At Tuesday's sentencing in federal court, Magistrate Judge Karen Strombom said she had no choice but to send Timothy Allen to prison because he lied to investigators.

 

Read the rest of the story here:

http://www.seattlepi.com/local/6420ap_wa_eagle_nest_sentence.html

 

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Caltrans shows picture of young eagles in their nest

Wildlife News

 

Caltrans released this picture of all three young eagles in their nest today.

Courtesy of Caltrans

Caltrans released this picture of all three young eagles in their nest today.

The three young eagles living near Turtle Bay and the Highway 44 construction zone in Redding appear to be doing fine, even though their nest has been vacant in the daytime for most of the past four days, a California Department of Transportation spokeswoman said today.

A photograph taken today and distributed by Caltrans shows "a midday collaboration" of the juvenile eagle trio in their nest, spokeswoman Denise Yergenson said.

 

Read the rest of the story here:

http://www.redding.com/news/2009/jun/16/caltrans-shows-picture-young-eagles-their-nest/

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Two of three Turtle Bay eagles take flight

Wildlife News

 

By Dylan Darling (Contact)
Saturday, June 13, 2009

Two of the three Turtle Bay bald eaglets have taken flight, say those keeping close watch on Redding's famous avian family.

The youngest, and smallest, of the eaglets that hatched in late March is likely the one lingering close to the nest, said Denise Yergenson, spokeswoman for the California Department of Transportation in Redding.

Read the rest of the story here:
 

http://www.redding.com/news/2009/jun/13/two-of-three-turtle-bay-eagles-take-flight/

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Turtle Bay eagle cam may be off until next nesting season

Wildlife News

 

By Dylan Darling (Contact)
Originally published 02:21 p.m., June 9, 2009
Updated 02:21 p.m., June 9, 2009

Photo by Dylan Darling / Record Searchlight

Susan Weaver of Shasta Lake watches the Turtle Bay eaglets this morning through a field scope. Weaver was among about 25 people who turned out for a "Fledgefest." Another is set for 7 p.m. today on the paved bike path between the Monolith and Highway 44 at Turtle Bay.
Off the Internet for much of the last three weeks, the Turtle Bay bald eagle cam may not be back up until next nesting season toward the end of the year.

“We just can’t get it back,” Denise Yergenson, spokeswoman for the California Department of Transportation, said today.

For the rest of the story and a couple of videos/photographs, go here:

http://www.redding.com/news/2009/jun/09/turtle-bay-eagle-cam-may-be-until-next-nesting-sea/

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Turtle Bay eagle almost ready to fledge

Wildlife News

 

The north state's most famous winged trio could finally be flying soon, but ongoing signal problems with a webcam focused on their nest could keep the sight off the Internet.

"It's something to do with the feed to the Web," said Denise Yergenson, spokeswoman for the California Department of Transportation.

Having busted out of their shells 11 weeks ago, the three bald eaglets in the nest at Turtle Bay likely will take their first flights next week. If nature's clock matches up with what has been observed by scientists, the first eagle would fly Tuesday, exactly 12 weeks after it hatched.

Yergenson said it's unclear whether the fledging will be seen on the Web. While the camera has produced images for scientists monitoring the eagles - it can be seen on a computer screen at Turtle Bay Exploration Park's visitor center - she said the webcast continues to periodically go on the fritz.

Read the rest of the story here:

http://www.redding.com/news/2009/jun/04/turtle-bay-eagle-almost-ready-to-fledge/

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Tangled eaglet triggers pleas for help

Wildlife News

 Webcam drama ends happily

 
  

The smallest of three bald eagle chicks in a Sidney nest equipped with a webcam got tangled in wire Thursday evening, prompting some of those watching the drama to issue a plea for help.

The chick was able to free itself, to the relief of the Internet audience.

The entanglement occurred less than two weeks after a chick at a nest on Hornby Island, which is also wired with a webcam, died after getting caught in the mother's feathers.

There's nothing anyone can legally do when the bald eagle chicks appear to be in peril, said David Hancock, whose Hancock Wildlife Foundation operates the cameras.

Read the rest of the story here:

http://www.timescolonist.com/Technology/Tangling+drama+ensnares+another+eaglet/1623654/story.html

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Internet followers of eagle cam watch helplessly as eaglet dies in B.C. nest

Wildlife News

 

Last Updated: Thursday, May 21, 2009 | 7:19 PM PT Comments118Recommend62

An eaglet, known as Echo, got entwined around its mother's feathers on Monday and later fell to the ground to its death.An eaglet, known as Echo, got entwined around its mother's feathers on Monday and later fell to the ground to its death. (Hancock Wildlife Foundation)

The smallest of two eaglets in a nest on Hornby Island, B.C., that wildlife enthusiasts have been observing online via a webcam has died after getting caught in its mother's feathers and falling to the ground.

The nest, located on a tree top, has a webcam installed above it. Thousands of visitors to the site that hosts the webcam watched helplessly as the event unfolded around 8 a.m. on Monday, said Karen Bills of the Hancock Wildlife Foundation. The webcam is part of the foundation's efforts to promote the conservation of wild habitats through science and education.

Read the rest of the story here:

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/british-columbia/story/2009/05/21/bc-trapped-eaglet-dies.html

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Popular dolphin dies at Vancouver Aquarium

Wildlife News

 

Updated Thu. May. 21 2009 9:32 PM ET

Darcy Wintonyk, ctvbc.ca

 

A popular inhabitant of the Vancouver Aquarium has passed away.

 

 

Laverne, a 31-year-old Pacific white-sided dolphin, died May 20, 2009, after battling an infection for the last month.

Laverne a 31-year-old female Pacific white-sided dolphin, died on Wednesday night after a month long illness.

 

Laverne -- the oldest white-sided dolphin in North America -- came to Vancouver in July 2005 from a SeaWorld in Texas, and quickly became a favourite at the facility.

 

READ MORE HERE 

 

http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/20090521/BC_dolphin_dies_aquarium_090521/20090521?hub=TopStories

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