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Reward offered for Eagle Feather thief

Source: http://www.ksl.com/?nid=148&sid=9920246

March 6, 2010

(Photo: Southwest Wildlife Foundation)

SALT LAKE CITY -- The Humane Society of the United States has put up a $2,500 reward to help find the person who plucked out an injured golden eagle's tail feathers after it survived being hit by a car in Utah.

According to the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, a car struck the golden eagle on Highway 50 near Salina on Feb. 27. After the crash, someone plucked out the bird's tail feathers with pliers, possibly causing permanent damage.

The eagle suffered additional bumps, cuts and bruises from the initial crash and is currently in the care of the Southwest Wildlife Foundation in Cedar City.

Workers at the wildlife center will try to rehabilitate the bird but say it's unclear if its tail feathers will grow back and whether it can be released to the wild.

The golden eagle is a protected species, and the person responsible for the attack could face up to a year in prison and fines of up to $100,000.

Anyone with any information should call the Division of Wildlife Resources poaching line at 1-800-662-3337.

 

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Bald Eagles Poisoned -- Alberta

Updated: Mon Feb. 15 2010 15:58:18

ctvcalgary.ca

Four sick birds that were brought to the Alberta Institute for Wildlife Conservation between November 2009 and January 2010 have died from lead poisoning.

Tissue samples taken from the Bald Eagles uncovered the presence of lead and confirmed the cause of death.

The shot that hunters use to bring down deer and game animals contains lead and the birds will eat it along with any carcasses left behind.

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Vancouver Island eagles died from lead poisoning: report

 

Bald eagles feed on a feast of halibut fish heads in Old Masset.
Bald eagles feed on a feast of halibut fish heads in Old Masset.
Photo Credit: David Gray, Calgary Herald

PORT ALBERNI, B.C. — Two Vancouver Island eagles that died last spring were killed by ingesting lead — possibly from eating fishing jigs or discarded lead shot, toxicology reports show.

The North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre recently received toxicology reports on two eagles submitted for testing in March 2009. The two eagles from the Parksville and Qualicum Beach were severely emaciated and had no fractures or visible hemorrhaging.

 

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Eagle poaching gets prison term

 


By David Hendee
WORLD-HERALD STAFF WRITER
 

An Omaha federal judge issued the stiffest jail sentence in recent memory Friday for a wildlife violation.

Judge Joseph Bataillon sentenced Lamar Bertucci Sr., 39, of Macy, Neb., to 366 days in prison for possession an eagle part.

Bataillon said he hoped the sentence would send a message to others who violate federal laws protecting eagles, hawks and other raptors.

Mark Webb, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service special agent who has worked as a state or federal officer in Nebraska off and on for more than three decades, said he wasn't aware of anyone receiving a longer jail sentence from a federal court in Nebraska for such a crime.

Read the rest of the story here:

http://www.omaha.com/article/20091009/NEWS01/910099983

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Did the Rat Island restoration effort kill 41 bald eagles

Jun 12, 2009 03:25 PM

 

Last year, one of the world’s most aggressive island restoration projects was launched to poison all the invasive rats on Alaska’s Rat Island, located in the western part of the Aleutian islands. But the extermination project may have taken an unexpected toll: a recent survey of the island recovered the corpses of 41 bald eagles and 186 glaucous-winged gulls – raising the possibility that the birds died after consuming poisoned rats.

“When you go to an island after a winter, it's not surprising to find bird carcasses,” says U.S. Fish and Wildlife spokesman Bruce Woods, “but not these numbers.” There were only four breeding pairs of the federally protected bald eagles residing on the island last year, but the population in the Aleutians numbers 2,500.

 

Read rest of Story here

 

http://www.scientificamerican.com/blog/60-second-science/post.cfm?id=did-the-rat-island-restoration-effo-2009-06-12

 

 

 

 

 

 

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