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Important wildlife habitat protected in Squamish

Conservation & Preservation

More than seven hectares of critical fish and wildlife habitat known as the Squamish Mamquam Blind Channel and encompassing the shared flood plain of the Squamish and Mamquam rivers have been protected under a multi-party agreement.

 

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Researchers call for conservation zone for killer whales in B.C.

Conservation & Preservation

 

A pod of about thirty orcas (killer whales) swims along the west coast of Vancouver Island off the West Coast Trail in this Jun. 12, 2002 file photo. Scientists are proposing that a key feeding ground for orcas near San Juan Island should be protected.
A pod of about thirty orcas (killer whales) swims along the west coast of Vancouver Island off the West Coast Trail in this Jun. 12, 2002 file photo. Scientists are proposing that a key feeding ground for orcas near San Juan Island should be protected.
Photo Credit: Debra Brash, Victoria Times Colonist

Wildlife researchers have identified the key feeding area for a critically endangered population of killer whales near Vancouver Island and proposed the creation of a unique, miniature conservation zone for the few square kilometres encompassing the animals' favourite seafood restaurant.

The international team of scientists, including University of British Columbia biologist Rob Williams and colleagues from Britain and the U.S., spent four months in the summer of 2006 painstakingly monitoring the movements of a three-pod population of killer whales in waters off B.C. and Washington state that numbers just 87 individuals — so few that every animal has been identified from distinctive markings.

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Chameleon species discovered in snake's mouth

Conservation & Preservation

 

A new species of chameleon was discovered in an African forest living in the mouth of a snake.

Published: 7:10AM GMT 24 Nov 2009

The tiny lizard came out of the mouth of a twig snake disturbed by Dr Andrew Marshall in Tanzania's Magombera forest.
 


Dr Marshall, from the University of York, was in the threatened forest surveying monkeys.

He said today: ''I was out there doing conservation research when I came across this snake. It saw me and fled, and as it did so spat out a chameleon.
 

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Conservation: Minimum Population Size Targets Too Low To Prevent Extinction?

Conservation & Preservation

Web address:
     http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/
     091013104344.htm
 

Conservation: Minimum Population Size Targets Too Low To Prevent Extinction?


Critically endangered Black rhino (Diceros bicornis): Habitat loss and illegal harvest have reduced once abundant populations to a worldwide total of under 2,500. Only sustained conservation effort will allow the continued survival of the species. (Credit: iStockphoto/Alan Crawford)

ScienceDaily (Oct. 20, 2009) — Conservation biologists are setting their minimum population size targets too low to prevent extinction.

 

That's according to a new study by University of Adelaide and Macquarie University scientists which has shown that populations of endangered species are unlikely to persist in the face of global climate change and habitat loss unless they number around 5000 mature individuals or more.

The findings have been published online in the journal Biological Conservation.

"Conservation biologists routinely underestimate or ignore the number of animals or plants required to prevent extinction," says lead author Dr Lochran Traill, from the University of Adelaide's Environment Institute.

"Often, they aim to maintain tens or hundreds of individuals, when thousands are actually needed. Our review found that populations smaller than about 5000 had unacceptably high extinction rates. This suggests that many targets for conservation recovery are simply too small to do much good in the long run."

 

 

Please use the link below to finsh reading this article:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091013104344.htm#

 

Journal reference:

Traill et al. Pragmatic population viability targets in a rapidly changing world. Biological Conservation, 2009; DOI: 10.1016/j.biocon.2009.09.001

 

 

 

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France-Size Shark Sanctuary Created -- A First

Conservation & Preservation
 
September 25, 2009
 

The world's first shark sanctuary will protect the declining fish in waters off the tiny island republic of Palau, the country's president said today.

Johnson Toriboing announced the creation of a shark haven without commercial fishing during an address before the United Nations General Assembly in New York City.

palau shark picture  

"I believe the physical well-being and beauty of sharks reflects the well-being of the ocean," Toriboing told reporters at a news conference."It is my honor and opportunity to tell the world to join me to protect these species, which are on the brink of extinction."Sharks are increasingly under threat as the demand for shark-fin soup—a delicacy in many Asian countries—has risen worldwide. 

"The need to save the ocean and save sharks far outweighs the need to enjoy bowls of soup," Toriboing said. 

More on the story found here...

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2009/09/090925-sharks-sanctuary-palau.html

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