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One Eagle Dies at Recovery Center


Additional bird taken to Anchorage after collision with vehicle
Article published on Tuesday, Jan 15th, 2008
By RALPH GIBBS
Kodiak Daily Mirror Writer

Since Friday, national radio stations and newspapers have turned an eagle eye to Kodiak after what some U.S. Fish and Wildlife officials are calling the worst Kodiak bird disaster since the Exxon Valdez oil spill.

Another life was claimed when an eagle died overnight Monday at the Bird Treatment and Learning Center in Anchorage.

“He had not been responding well and was kind of depressed,” said Marry Bethe Wright, a volunteer at the bird center. “We were monitoring him very closely. People were here all night and checking on him every couple of hours.”

BTLC volunteers continue to fight to save the rest of the eagles.

“Everyone else seems to be up and very alert,” Wright said. “The ones that have been washed are looking good.”

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Eagles Recovering After Plunge in Fish Guts


20 birds die from dousing
Article published on Monday, Jan 14th, 2008
By RALPH GIBBS
Kodiak Daily Mirror Writer

Gary Wheeler from the Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge Center said today that 17 of the bald eagles that survived an ill-fated dive into the back of an Ocean Beauty Seafoods fish waste truck were flown to the Bird Treatment and Learning Center in Anchorage.

The remaining 13 of the 50 eagles that dived into the truck on Friday are to be flown to Anchorage later today. Twenty eagles died.

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Eagle Death Toll Now at 22 After Mishap

Bald Eagles Recovering After Disastrous Dive Into Alaska Fish Truck; Death Toll at 22

The Associated Press

ANCHORAGE, Alaska Jan 13, 2008 (AP)

Most of the 30 bald eagles who survived a disastrous dive into a truck full of fish guts are close to recovery, said officials at the Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge.

They say two birds have died, but most of the remaining have perked up and may soon be released. Another 20 eagles died after the birds mobbed the uncovered truck at Ocean Beauty Seafoods on Friday.

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At Least 20 Eagles Die Looking for Easy Meal

From the Anchorage Daily News

Factory workers try to save birds from quicksand-like goo

By JAMES HALPIN
jhalpin@adn.com | jhalpin@adn.com

Published: January 12th, 2008 12:25 AM
Last Modified: January 12th, 2008 04:45 AM

Dozens of bald eagles descended on a dump truck hauling fish guts at a Kodiak processing plant Friday and got tangled in the mess, leaving at least 20 of the birds drowned, buried or crushed, according to federal wildlife officials.

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Annual Bald Eagle Survey Yields Important Results

Wildlife NewsA key annual event in the recovery of bald eagle populations is entering its 30th year this week as hundreds of observers nationwide take part in the Midwinter Bald Eagle Survey. Observers from federal, state and local agencies, as well as conservation groups and private citizens, will participate in the survey by counting eagles along standard routes from January 2-16.

"The purpose of the survey is to monitor the status of wintering populations of bald eagles in the contiguous United States by estimating national and regional count trends," said Wade Eakle, the national survey coordinator and an ecologist for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). This is the first time the USACE is coordinating the survey. 

This week, the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) also announces results of a new analysis using the count data from 1986 through 2005. The analysis, based on 178,896 observations of wintering eagles during 8,674 surveys of 746 routes in 43 states, shows counts of wintering bald eagles increasing nationwide at a rate of 1.7% per year. Increases in counts over the 20-year period were highest in the northeast portion of the United States, with a 6% increase each year. In contrast, counts in the southwest portion decreased 1.2% each year over 20 years. Seventy-six percent of survey routes north of 40 degrees latitude had increasing count trends, but only 50% of routes south of 40 degrees latitude showed increasing trends.

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