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HANCOCK FORUM NEWSLETTER Issue No 2 ~ October 5, 2007

Newsletters
HANCOCK FORUM NEWSLETTER

Issue No 2 ~ October 5, 2007
Editors: Cobbler39/Blue Heaven
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image ... FEATURE STORY

LOCATION OF THE HANCOCK LIVE WEB CAMS

This is a geographical reference that can be referred to if you are not familiar with the location of the various nests and estuaries on webcams.

David Hancock has made several comments about disclosing the exact locations. He believes that if we live near a nest, we should be aware of it and be good stewards of it. David wrote an article when the Haines, Alaska webcam was operating earlier this fall. His update on the Chilkat River nest, .....Hancock Wildlife Channel/Wildlife News/Haines Bald Eagle Nest gave very detailed directions to find the nest. David had this to say: "I don't want the first question to be: Are you sure you want to let someone know where an eagle is nesting? Yes I do. End of that story. Like British Columbia, Alaska has thousands of nesting pairs of bald eagles. Every Alaskan along the coast knows of many. What I want you all to do is continue to care for them, to keep their environment clean and healthy and protect them."

The Haines Highway follows the Chilkat River which flows through the "The Valley of the Eagles" in Haines, Alaska. Here is a map that shows Haines on the Alaskan Panhandle in relation to the Sidney nest on the southern end of Vancouver Island:
image

This map shows southern Vancouver Island and its relation to Vancouver on the mainland.
imageThe Sidney and Burnaby eagle nests
are marked as well as the Goldstream Estuary at the end of the Saanich Inlet. The other location marked on this map is the Chehalis River Estuary to the east of Vancouver. The Chehalis River flows into the Harrison River (a well-known tourist spot is Harrison Hot Springs) which flows into the mighty Fraser River, the major river draining southern British Columbia.

Zooming in closer, the next map shows the various nests that have been followed on the forum. The southern end of Vancouver Island is shaped like a hook, with the Saanich Peninsula stretching northward and forming the Saanich Inlet.
imageThe various locations are marked. (You might also note Esquimalt, to the west of Victoria, where the Osprey Cam is situated.)

This more simplified map shows the municipal regions of the Saanich Peninsula with the urban area of the town of Sidney on the eastern side of the peninsula. The nest is located in the rural municipality of North Saanich. This is a virtual paradise for eagles with plenty of food, beaches, fields, forests, and streams.
imageIt is a short flight
over the protected waters of the Saanich Inlet, to the Goldstream Estuary, and an even shorter flight for the Brentwood Nest eagles. The white star is the Sidney nest on the shores of Patricia (Pat) Bay. The red star is the Brentwood nest, right next door to the end of the Inlet and the Goldstream Estuary.

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Backyard Birds Disappearing

Wildlife News

Decline of the songbirds
Last Updated June 22, 2007
CBC News

It's not been a good year for the birds and the bees. A few months ago, media outlets were seized with the unexpected collapse of otherwise thriving bee colonies across the U.S. and in parts of Canada, a mystery that still has scientists baffled.

Now, the National Audubon Society in the U.S. has reported on a devastating decline in the common bird. The 20 most popular species ó the warblers and songbirds that frequent our backyard feeders, as well as the small ducks and game birds that scurry through fields and wetlands ó have seen their numbers drop an astounding 54 per cent over the past 40 years, the NAS says. The top 10 birds in this category have seen their numbers dwindle by an average of more than 70 per cent.
Click here for more on this story (CBC.CA)

Northern bobwhite: A staggering 25 million fewer today than in the mid-1960s, according to the New York-based National Audubon Society. (National Audubon Society/Canadian Press)

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Hancock Forum Newsletter - Issue No. 1 - September, 2007

NewslettersHANCOCK FORUM NEWSLETTER

Issue No 1 ~ September, 2007
Editors: cobbler39/Blue Heaven
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image... FEATURE STORY

Welcome to the first edition of the Hancock Forum Newsletter.

I have been toying with the idea of a Newsletter--for a few weeks now, and finally put my idea out to the other Moderators, for their opinions and they all wholeheartedly agreed that a Newsletter would indeed be beneficial to both members of the forum and the moderating team.
I have asked Blue Heaven to be my co-editor, and she has readily agreed. Thank you Blue.
As we roam the forum wearing our moderator hats, we see many items of interest, and we hope to bring those to all of you in the form of this Newsletter. All Mods will assist in gathering the news as they see items of interest throughout the forum.
We envision having a few standard features under headings such as:

Feature Story:

Nest News: (brief update on the nests)

Wingbeats:(Eagle news)

Eagleholics In The News: (This will be your news, as you share your holiday plans, births, operations, death of family members and friends, etc. The moderators will report these items to Blue Heaven and myself as they read your posts,)

Hancock Wildlife Nest Builders: (where we highlight the Bio of a different person each issue)

I hope you enjoy our efforts,
Laura, Cobbler39.
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Let the eagles stay: Burnaby senior

Wildlife NewsOne of our Foundation members, Will Patterson (aka willpat) got his name in the local Burnaby, BC paper this weekend with his stand on an eagle nest on property slated for development.

"By Michael McQuillan/NewsLeader

Mario Bartel/Newsleader
Will Patterson says he's worried a plan to develop a vacant lot on Norfolk St., just off Canada Way, will disturb an eagle's nest in a tall cottonwood tree at the edge of the lot.

A Burnaby senior wants to stop a developer from taking out trees on an undeveloped lot that is home to an bald eaglesí nest.

Will Patterson spent much of the spring and summer watching and videotaping a pair of eagles successfully raise their two eaglets. The tree stands in a property slated for development and Patterson would like the city of Burnaby to protect the area by reversing its original decision.

The property is in Broadview Park off Norfolk Street. Itís believed the eagles built the nest in February.

Around the same time, the city OKíd the development plans for a high density four-storey building.

Now that the nest has been discovered, Patterson says thatís a good reason for the city to review the development plans..."

For the full story, please see the Burnaby Newsleader web site

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The Orca Oil Spill Aftermath: HELP!

Planet EarthThis update is from Paul & Helena Spong of the ORCA LAB

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Subject: Robson Bight oil spill action alert
From: orcalab

Hello everyone,

Many of you already know about the August 20th oil spill that happened when a barge tipped its load of logging equipment into the waters of the Robson Bight (Michael Bigg) Ecological Reserve in British Columbia, Canada. The Reserve was created in 1982 to protect vital orca habitat. Nearly 60 orcas, fully 25% of the Northern Resident orca community, were exposed to toxic diesel vapours in the aftermath of the accident. Severe health consequences (e.g. lung lesions, pneumonia) are possible, though it may take considerable time for them to appear. Next year, we may know more.

In the meantime, the equipment, which carried 19,000L of diesel and other oils, remains on the bottom in an unknown state. It needs to be inspected as a matter of urgency, before winter storms arrive, to assess the remaining danger. Canada's Coastguard, the responsible agency, is dragging its feet on the inspection issue, despite pressure from provincial and local governments, and the public at large. NGOs, led by the Living Oceans Society and Greenpeace, have vowed to undertake the inspection if Canada's federal government refuses. The orcas are simply too important to allow uncertainty.

We are writing this to ask you to do two things that will help:

1. Go to the Living Oceans web site and send a message to Canada's Minister of Fisheries and Oceans:

2. Contribute what you can to NGO funds being raised for the underwater inspection. $16,000 more is needed:

Canada's government needs to hear our voices. NGOs need our support, so they can act if governments refuse.
What we are asking will take just a few minutes of your time, and money you can afford. Please act now.

For the orcas, thank you very much!

Paul & Helena

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