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A first view of the Stanley Park Heronry

Stanley Park Heronry
On the afternoon of December 18, 2006, I visited the heronry near the tennis courts by English Bay, just on the Eastern edge of Stanley Park. I was accompanied by Dalyce the heron expert from the Stanely Park Ecology Society. As much as anything, I wanted to see for myself the extent of the colony since the last time I'd seen herons at the park, they were in the trees around what at that time was the zoo area, near the famous Stanley Park Aquarium, in a whole different area of the park. I also wanted to see what damage the trees had received in the storms of the previous weeks. The park in general has sustained huge impact, with acres of trees in some parts simply devastated. Right near the nest we saw this conifer's root ball with the tree itself fortunately pointing away from the nest trees.

Dalyce met me near the parking lot of the Parks Board offices which is just below some of the trees the herons have taken over. She had a plan of the area showing the trees with monikers of "A", "B", etc. and we discussed the potential placement of one or more cameras.

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Copyright and the Media Gallery

Media + CopyrightWe live in a new era of creativity. It is not just that we now have digital cameras, high-resolution video, huge ability to store all manner of visual and auditory content, ability to create computer-generated graphics, etc.; it is that we also have the means to make 100% copies of the works of others and whether purposely or inadvertently, turn them to our own use.

I've grown up with and made a business of the digital and internet revolution. I've been a part of its growth, and been involved in many of the controversies and discussions about its effects on society in general and artists, writers, photographers, and musicians in particular.

Here at Hancock Wildlife Foundation we are experiencing some of the same problems I've dealt with in other venues, and I think we need to examine what we're doing and understand the consequences - and fix the problem before it becomes a real issue.

Please read on for more

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The Goldstream Ecology Center

Goldstream Park CamerasBob Chappell has worked with the staff of the Goldstream Ecology Center to create an interactive wildlife presence. Here are some of his images taken there.
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The Goldstream Cameras are up (Updated Jan 7)

Goldstream Park CamerasI've just been watching the first live stream of the season - from the two channels at Goldstream Park near Victoria.

I was over at the park with Bill Gosse (retired Telus microwave person) and working on the link (again) Thursday and Friday (Jan 4/5). The microwave link radios that had been in for a month of storms and such did not fair well. They all had external antenna links and it appears that water was getting into the cables causing them to lose signal. They were showing link levels at the 15-20% level where they should have been up well over 60% or better. We replaced 3 of the 4 radios on Thursday with new ones with internal antennas. The receive levels went up to where they should have been all along, but the link still had throughput problems. By the time we were finished, it was almost dark and down close to freezing out on the marina location where we were doing our link testing. I dropped Bill off at the ferry and stayed overnight at my brother's in Victoria.

Friday it was raining hard (snowing in Vancouver which I'm glad I missed). The new radios were all talking to each other but I had to get the throughput problem fixed. A call to Engenius' support line brought a suggestion that they not all be configured the same. Each pair should have been a Bridge-Access Point pair where I had them all set up as Bridge. These systems are new to us so it has been a learning experience. Getting the pairs set up correctly meant a trip to each of the locations - in the rain. Shades of when we first set them up.

All the reconfiguration took the rest of the day, but the link finally firmed up with 0% packet loss just after 4PM. It has been rock solid ever since.

Read on for more pictures and the link info:

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Bull Shoals State Park Eagle Awareness

Wildlife NewsSubmirtted by Christi_T

The Bull Shoals-White River State Park here in Arkansas has an annual Eagle Awareness program. I haven't been to it before, but I wasn't involved in all that David has sparked in me! If anyone is interested in attending, contact me and I'll help with information about area accommodations. Here's the little write-up about it.

Each year approximately 100 bald eagles visit the Bull Shoals area. Enjoy festivities centered on our national symbol. Activities include lake tours, guided bird walks, guest speakers, live bird demonstrations and live entertainment. Contact the park for a detailed schedule.

Admission: Free, except lake cruises. Cruises: $6.25 adults, $3 kids ages 6-12
E-mail: bullshoalswhiteriver at arkansas.com

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