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CAmpbell River Eagle Festival - Release

Teachers Background Data

Campbell River Bald Eagle Festival  --  Eagle Release Video

Each February  not only do Bald Eagles gather in and around Campbell River on Vancouver Island BC to feast on the spawning herring but "Eaqle Watchers" descend to see them and enjoy the fine Festival to honor them.   The Mountainaire Avian Rescue Society  puts on the annual Fest and a highlight is the release of one of the eagles they have received 'hurt' but have spent countless hours mending, rehabilitating and again conditioning the bird so it can again live in the wild.

A Festival highlight, over and above the fine conservation -- educational displays and the list of fine lecturers, is the acutal release of an eagle back into the wild.

The following video, created by Laura Murphy of Angus Productions in cooperation with the Hancock Wildlife Foundation and BCIT, shows both the emotion-filled release and a glimpse at Festival activities.

     Campbell River Bald Eagle Festival Video


For details on the February 21, 2009 Festival see:

     www.wingtips.org/eagle_fest.htm

 

Have a good festival

David Hancock

 

 

 

 

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Father, kids witness bald eagle beating

Father, kids witness bald eagle beating
Father, kids witness bald eagle beating

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Sharp-eyed rescuers revive eagle found clinging to life

Sharp-eyed rescuers revive eagle found clinging to life
By Scott Sandsberry

Yakima Herald-Republic

YAKIMA The caller had reported seeing a dead eagle in his pasture, so when John McGowan approached it, he certainly didn't think he was looking at Sleeping Beauty.

Yep, he thought. Dead bald eagle.

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Bald Eagles Re-Use Same Nest -- Sometimes.

Bald Eagle Biology

Do Bald Eagles Reuse the Same Nest Year After Year?

The answer is commonly yes but the eagle territory often houses two or three alternative nests.  I use the word ‘territory’ here because this concept is really more important to eagles than the specific nest.  A breeding territory for eagles only houses a single active nest each year. On the other hand this territory may contain several nests that are alternatively used.

Most active eagle territories support a single nest that is used year after year.  So why do some  territories supports alternative nests and others don’t.  Good question and no single answer is likely applicable to all circumstances.  While a good solid undisturbed 600 year old conifer may support or have supported an eagles nest for 100 or even 200 or more years, most nests don’t last that long.  And certainly the breeding pair of eagles don’t last that long.  It is believed that eagles can live 50 or more years.  Most don’t.   While many conifer trees can live several hundred years most don’t and most deciduous trees live under 100 years. 

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Age of a Bald Eagle Nest

Bald Eagle Biology

Bald Eagle Nest: Probably pushing 100 years old -- PLUS!

Between 1963 and 1967 a bald eagle nest in my Barkley Sound Vancouver Island study area was annually used and produced 1 or 2 young each year. This leaning cedar tree was probably in excess of 300 years of age. The nest was very old and worn from many years of constant use. I had climbed to the nest in the 1960's and my notes state it was a very old nest, “well weathered and lived in”, size, 6 feet 2 inches across and about 2.5 feet deep. The nest had probably been occupied the previous 30 - 50 years.

This nest was one of 136 occupied territories in that part of Barkley Sound that I studied.


Another Visit to Same Nest  in 2003

In July of 2003 my wife, daughter and I were kayaking in Barkley Sound and, as we rounded the southern end of this same Island, I stated how in the early days my favorite nest was suspended over the water in a leaning cedar tree. We rounded the bend and there was the same leaning cedar – with two large full grown young standing in the nest.

As an update to the above, Barkley Sound was largely logged just prior to the 1950's and by the 1970's was designated part of the West Coast Regional National Park. During my study period in the mid 1960's we never saw more than 1 kayak or canoe party per summer and perhaps 3 to 5 pleasure boats. Commercial salmon trollers and shrimp trawlers were constantly working the Imperial Eagle Channel. Today the adjacent area houses numerous trailer parks and campsites, boat launch ramps and an incredible armada of kayaks, canoes and pleasure boats. And the area seemed to have as many bald eagles as it did 40 years ago. Not all is lost.

A question comes to mind: Will a tree sustain an eagle's nest for two or three hundred years? Certainly the trees can live twice that long. And how many different adult eagles nested in this single location? 


David Hancock

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