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Wild hawk swoops in to Vancouver's Science World

Wildlife News
 
 
 
 
A hawk that got caught up under the entrance to Vancouver's Science World on Monday is released by Kevin Wakahara after being trapped in a net.
 

A hawk that got caught up under the entrance to Vancouver's Science World on Monday is released by Kevin Wakahara after being trapped in a net.

Photograph by: Ian Smith, Vancouver Sun

VANCOUVER — A hawk became an accidental, but short-lived exhibit at Science World Monday when it became trapped inside a maze-like sculpture near the facility’s entrance.

The medium-sized bird, known as a Cooper’s hawk, was able to fly inside the Tower of Bauble because netting had been removed so that the kinetic-audio structure could be repaired.

The hawk was unable to navigate its way out of the Tower of Bauble and hunkered down on a high rafter once a rescue operation was mounted.

Read the rest of the story here:

http://www.vancouversun.com/Wild+hawk+swoops+Vancouver+Science+World/1993307/story.html

 

View Printable Version

Wild hawk swoops in to Vancouver's Science World

Wildlife News

 

VANCOUVER — A hawk became an accidental, but short-lived exhibit at Science World Monday when it became trapped inside a maze-like sculpture near the facility’s entrance.

The medium-sized bird, known as a Cooper’s hawk, was able to fly inside the Tower of Bauble because netting had been removed so that the kinetic-audio structure could be repaired.

The hawk was unable to navigate its way out of the Tower of Bauble and hunkered down on a high rafter once a rescue operation was mounted.

Science World employees, along with staff from OWL, a Delta-based wildlife rescue society, chased the hawk from the rafter and caught the trapped bird mid-flight in a net.

The hawk was released outside of Science World after Rob Hope of the Orphaned Wildlife Rehabilitation Society determined the bird was uninjured and could fly.

Hope said the hawk probably could have lasted three or four days inside the Tower of Bauble without food.

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Tiny fish scores big victory for endangered species

Wildlife News

CBC Technology and Science News: Environmentalists say they have won an important legal victory to protect endangered species across Canada, all because of a tiny fish known as the Nooksack dace, an endangered species no more than 15 centimetres long.

In the ruling issued Wednesday, the Federal Court admonished the fisheries and oceans minister for failing to identify the habitat of the Nooksack dace, which lives in only four streams in B.C.'s Lower Mainland.

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Living on burrowed time

Wildlife News
Published: September 08, 2009 3:00 PM
Updated: September 08, 2009 3:41 PM

Clutching butterfly nets, pet carrying cases and a pipe with a sponge plunger on the end, Mike Mackintosh and Frank Tolksdorf ease into the 50- by 70-foot enclosure behind Monika’s Wildlife Shelter in Port Kells.

As they step quietly on the sawdust floor making tactical plans to fill their carriers, they are watched by dozens of pairs of wary eyes perched along the corners of the walls and ceiling. A few eye them from the shadows at ground level.

It takes the two men an hour to collect more than three dozen young burrowing owls for testing. Some are caught in the air along their cage walls. Others are herded further into their eight-inch-wide burrows with the soft-tipped plunger and are taken out by hand at the far side.

 

Read the rest of the story and see the video here:

http://www.bclocalnews.com/surrey_area/surreyleader/community/57822227.html

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Fraser River sockeye fry had little chance because of fish farms

Planet Earth
 
 
 
 
I thought I was living in another universe the other day. I felt this way because our own Department of Fisheries and Oceans minister, Gail Shea, was in Norway at the major aquaculture get-together wooing them to come to Canada. Doesn't that seem strange?

It should because Norwegian companies own 92 per cent of the fish farms in B.C. But, according to our minister, we need vastly more of them in B.C. because it is "important to the Canadian economy." But here in B.C., it is becoming plain as day that the Fraser River sockeye collapse happened in the ocean as smolts swam past fish farms on their way to sea two years ago.

Read the rest of the story here:

http://www.timescolonist.com/news/Fraser+River+sockeye+little+chance+because+fish+farms/1971312/story.html

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