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Eagle Corridor Through the Rockies!

Conservation & Preservation
Rocky Mountain Eagle Research FoundationMission - To increase knowledge of Golden Eagle, Bald Eagle and other raptor migrations in Western Canada. What is the "Eagle Highway?"

On March 20 1992, Peter Sherrington and Des Allen were conducting a general bird survey in the Kananaskis Valley near Mount Lorette. Late in the morning Peter observed an adult Golden Eagle soaring high above the valley to the east of Mount Lorette. A short time after they saw two adults soaring over the mountain. These two birds were quickly joined by a third. All three moved off to the northwest, to be replaced a few minutes later by more birds moving from the southeast. By the end of the day Peter and Des had counted over 100 Golden Eagles migrating to the northwest. Two days later Peter led a group of amateur naturalists to the area to look for eagles and they were rewarded by seeing nearly 250 Golden Eagles flying from southeast to northwest in a single afternoon.

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Welcome to the British Columbia Breeding Birds Atlas


Submitted: David Hancock



Birds can tell us important things about our environment. Their presence and abundance provide an early warning of the state
of ecosystems and their eggs and tissues track trends of contaminants in the environment.

Over 300 species of birds breed each year in British Columbia - more than any other province in Canada. Sixty-five species breed nowhere else in Canada and for several other species, British Columbia holds the majority of the world population. For these reasons, British Columbia plays a pivotal role in Canada's bird conservation efforts
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Shooter sought in Eagle Death

This is a follow-up to the story posted on January 16, 2008

From the Bradenton Herald (Florida)
January 17, 2008

EAST MANATEE (Florida) --The body of a female bald eagle was driven to a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service lab Wednesday as outrage grew against the person who would shot into the protected nest of America's national bird.

According to Fish and Wildlife Special Agent Janet Rider, the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act provides for an award of up to $1,000 for anyone with information that leads to a conviction.

Lynda White, coordinator of the Audubon of Florida Eagle Watch program, said the organization is nonprofit and cannot offer any additional funds for an award.

Several readers of the Bradenton Herald have indicated they would contribute to an award fund.

How to help

Anyone with information about the death of the bald eagle can contact Special Agent Janet Rider, of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service office, at (352) 429-1037, ext. 308.

To contribute to an award fund, contact Lynda White, with the Audubon of Florida Eagle Watch program, at (407) 644-0190.

For the rest of the article, go here: http://www.bradenton.com/local/story/334403.html

Click on the following link to add a comment::

http://discuss.hancockwildlifechannel.org/viewtopic.php?p=214311#p214311

 

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Seafood Co. Gives Fish, $11,000 to Eagle Rehab

Article published on Wednesday, Jan 16th, 2008
By RALPH GIBBS
Kodiak Daily Mirror Writer

When 50 bald eagles dived into the back of an Ocean Beauty Seafoods truck preparing to transport a load of fish guts, they did so with dinner on their minds.

Now, officials with Ocean Beauty plan on providing that.

On Tuesday, company officials called the Bird Treatment and Learning Center in Anchorage where 29 eagles are being treated after their ill-fated plunge, and offered to help feed the birds.

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Eagle Found Shot, Dead in Nest

From the Bradenton Herald, Florida

January 16, 2008

A nesting eagle was shot and killed over the weekend, outraging members of the Audubon Eagle Watch Program in Manatee and Sarasota counties.

The nest, on Lena Road off State Road 64, is normally monitored by birdwatchers.

"As soon as I looked in the nest, I knew something was wrong. Both adults were in the nest. One was laying across the nest with its beak in the twigs. Something just didn't look right," said Tony Brown, 51, of Parrish, who has been watching the nest since October.

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