View Printable Version

Hancock Wildlife - Now With Instant Language Translations

Wildlife News

Some of you may have noted the small group of flags at the bottom of the right border. These little flags are the key to translating this portion of the HWF site into 35 different languages, from Arabic to Vietnamese.

The translation is done using Google's Translate facility and once you've started, you can follow links and each page you visit on our site will also be translated for you. Thankyou Google, and thanks to the people at glFusion, the open source software project our web site uses. We'll be adding more features over the coming months once the nesting season is over and things quiet down a bit.

View Printable Version

Fishing hopes high for Fraser River salmon run

Wildlife News

 

Published: July 06, 2009 2:00 PM
Updated: July 06, 2009 2:50 PM

0 Comments

 

Fishermen of all stripes are gearing up for what's predicted to be a big run of Fraser River salmon this summer.

If the forecasts are accurate as many as 10.6 million sockeye will head upriver – enough to provide ample fishing for commercial, sport and aboriginal sectors.

"It's shaping up to be a good year," said Pacific Salmon Commission chief biologist Mike Lapointe.

Read the rest of the story here:  http://www.bclocalnews.com/richmond_southdelta/richmondreview/news/50058777.html

View Printable Version

Adult eagles open nest for rescued young bird

Conservation & Preservation

 

 
 
 
 
Mindy Dick holds an eaglet with an injured leg that was moved and introduced to a different nest in Nanoose Bay, where it has been adopted by the adults.
 

Mindy Dick holds an eaglet with an injured leg that was moved and introduced to a different nest in Nanoose Bay, where it has been adopted by the adults.

Photograph by: Pacific Northwest Raptors LTD., Canwest News Service

A baby eagle that would not have survived on its own has been moved to a new nest in Nanoose Bay, where it has been adopted by two adults with a chick of their own.

A family discovered the injured eaglet on the West Coast Trail late last month. The bird had a sprained leg, likely from falling out of its nest. The family, stranded by bad weather in the boat-accessed area, fed the bird raw hamburger to keep it alive.

 

Read the rest of the story here:

http://www.timescolonist.com/Adult+eagles+open+nest+rescued+young+bird/1795624/story.html

View Printable Version

Sculptures take flight

Wildlife News

Whistler Bc .

Most of the bald eagles in the Sea to Sky corridor tend to congregate around Brackendale, but these days, you may have noticed the odd colourful eagle hanging out around Whistler.

Stephen Miller is the president and CEO of the B.C. Lions Society For Children with Disabilities, which includes Easter Seals and runs the Easter Seals camps in Squamish, Winfield and Shawnigan Lake.

 

Miller is also the man in charge of the Eagles in the City program, an annual fundraising event that supports children with disabilities. It was inspired by a similar artistic project launched in Zurich, Switzerland years ago.

 

Eagle Sculptures

This year, because orcas com

 

e from the water, and the spirit bears were on land, the third in the trilogy must be out of the sky, so we decided on Eagles in the City," Miller said.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read rest of story here

 

 http://www.piquenewsmagazine.com/pique/index.php?content=Eagles+1629

 

 

 

View Printable Version

Bald Eagle goes 'Back to the Wild'

Conservation & Preservation

 

July 2, 2009 Castalia OH

 

FREMONT -- A female Bald Eagle perched next to its nest Wednesday morning, anxiously awaiting the return of its mate following a one-month stay at Back to the Wild rehabilition center in Castalia.

 

The male Bald Eagle who suffered injuries to its wing and a puncture wound to its leg, believed to be the result of a fight with another bird, was found a quarter mile from its nest. The bird fully recovered with the assistance of Mona Rutger, a licensed wildlife rehabilitator and owner of Back to the Wild, as well as Marianne Socha, a veterinarian at Firelands Animal Hospital in Huron.

"It's very difficult to rehabilitate and return a Bald Eagle back to the wild," Rutger said.

A bald eagle that was rehabilitated at Back To The Wild takes to flight following its release on Wednesday.

A bald eagle that was rehabilitated at Back To The Wild takes to flight following its release on Wednesday.

read the rest of story here

 

http://www.thenews-messenger.com/article/20090702/NEWS01/907020312

?

Please Donate

Please Donate!

Current & Ongoing Promotions

 

 

 

 

 

 

My Account





Sign up as a New User
Lost your password?