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Bald eagles are on a comeback in the East, especially in Virginia.

Bald Eagle Biology

 

 July 8, 2009 Virginia

Fans of our national bird for the first time can now go online and pinpoint locations of bald eagle nests in Virginia, thanks to the efforts of the Center for Conservation Biology.

A Google Maps application will allow users to locate known eagle nests and view their locations on a county-by-county basis. The VAEagles website marks the first time in the 54-year history of the center’s annual survey of nesting eagles that nest locations are made available to the public. The site shows the location of all known nests from the 2009 census survey.
The 2009 Virginia bald eagle survey shows the number of known breeding pairs has increased nearly 5 percent—

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http://www.wm.edu/news/stories/2009/VAeagles-007.php

 

Eagle's nest

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Eagle flew off with cat

Wildlife News

Thursday, July 02, 2009

BELCHERTOWN - Ellen M. Majka was inside her home on Prescott Hill when she saw a bald eagle swoop down into her neighbor's yard.

It was the first time she saw a bald eagle in the neighborhood.

But even more surprising was what she saw in its talons when it flew back up - a black cat

According to eagle experts, a bald eagle capturing a cat is not impossible, but highly unusual

While the main diet of bald eagles is fish, Davis said they are opportunistic and will eat squirrels, turtles, even Canada geese. They are also to feast on animal carcasses, including deer

 

Read the rest of story here --2 pages

http://www.masslive.com/springfield/republican/index.ssf?/base/news-22/1246520757165740.xml&coll=1

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Bald eagle healing, will be released soon

Conservation & Preservation

Daily News Michigan
kdame@mdn.net

Published: Saturday, July 4, 2009 11:16 PM EDT
His hard yellow-ringed stare is unnerving, light glinting off the pools of black in the center of his eyes.

Soon, those eyes will be looking down on the world again from the sky above, rather than out of the screened window of a flight pen at the Wildlife Recovery Association in western Midland County. The association receives injured raptors from all over Michigan, provides medical treatment and rehabilitation, then releases the birds.

Joe and Barb Rogers estimate the 18-year-old bald eagle — his age was determined from a band placed on one of his legs when he was about four months old — will be ready to return to the wild within a couple of weeks. Barb said she has not yet requested more detailed information from the band, such as where the eagle was banded.

The raptor was plucked from the wild after an early June phone call reported a bald eagle was resting on a stump in the river at the Chippewa Nature Center, unable to fly. “Even a bird with a broken wing can move a mile in one hour,” Joe said, explaining the urgency of reaching the destination quickly.

 

READ THE REST OF THE STORY HERE

http://ourmidland.com/articles/2009/07/04/local_news/doc4a4ebc213ebdd532140751.txt

 

 

 

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Frenchman hoping to be first to paraglide across Channel

Wildlife News

A French falconer will try to become the first man to paraglide across the Channel later this month – and the bald eagle he taught to fly will soar alongside him.

 

Read the rest of the story here

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/france/5810774/Frenchman-hoping-to-be-first-to-paraglide-across-Channel.html

 

French Jacques-Olivier Travers flies with his eagle Sherkan in Saint-Hilaire-du-Touvet during the 34th Icarus cup, September 2007

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Senate hearing focuses on threats to wildlife

Conservation & Preservation

 

WASHINGTON (AP) - From a mysterious fungus attacking bats in the Northeast to the emergence of Burmese pythons in Florida, native wildlife is facing new threats throughout the country.

Protecting wildlife from new diseases and invasive species is a top challenge facing state and federal officials. Experts and public officials will talk about the threats - and ways to combat them - at a Senate hearing Wednesday.

Read rest of story here

 

 

http://news.lp.findlaw.com/ap/a/w/1153/07-08-2009/20090708030506_01.html

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