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Bats, Birds and Lizards Can Fight Climate Change

Wildlife News

Wired Science is reporting the potential for some of our smaller critters to help us manage climate change. 

The presence, abundance and diversity of birds, bats and lizards, the top predators in the insect world, has impacts on the growth of plants,” said ecologist Daniel Gruner of the University of Maryland, co-author of the paper (absract) published April 5 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.If you don’t have plants, you don’t have organisms that are recapturing carbon.

The actual paper is a bit technical but I found it worth looking at, if only to get a flavor for some of the research that is going on in this area. Read on for more from Wired Science...

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Canadian wildcat makes 2,000-kilometre trek home

Wildlife News

 

A radio-collared male Canadian lynx
called M0509 which holds a homerange on Brian Anger's trapline near
Nordegg, Alta., an Alberta town north of Banff National Park. The lynx
is part of University of Alberta researcher Gabriela Yates' study on the
mechanisms driving the population cycles of the Canadian lynx.
A radio-collared male Canadian lynx called M0509 which holds a homerange on Brian Anger's trapline near Nordegg, Alta., an Alberta town north of Banff National Park. The lynx is part of University of Alberta researcher Gabriela Yates' study on the mechanisms driving the population cycles of the Canadian lynx.
Photo Credit: Myrna Pearman/University of Alberta, Photo Handout

It's not called the Canada lynx for nothing.

Wildlife experts are describing as "incredible" the 2,000-kilometre journey home of a tuft-eared wildcat that was captured as a young adult in British Columbia in 2003 and transported to Colorado for a landmark lynx-reintroduction program — where it sired at least six offspring — before being trapped this winter in Alberta.

That's right: the cat came back. And its homeward-bound, cross-border odyssey to Canada, culminating with its death on a trap line north of Banff National Park in January, is the longest ever recorded for the species — by far.

Despite the animal's unfortunate end, its epic trek over such a vast expanse of North America — across countless highways, numerous mountain ranges and probably a stretch of northwest Colorado desert — is being hailed as an inspiring sign of nature's resilience after generations of severe habitat loss and depleted wildlife populations.

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Bears and deer die at oil sands sites

Planet Earth

 

A tailings pond reflects the Syncrude
oilsands mine facility near Fort McMurray, Alta., Wednesday, July 9,
2008. (Jeff McIntosh / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

A tailings pond reflects the Syncrude oilsands mine facility near Fort McMurray, Alta., Wednesday, July 9, 2008. (Jeff McIntosh / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Updated: Thu Apr. 08 2010 17:49:56

ctvcalgary.ca

 Government documents show that animals other than ducks have died at Alberta's oil sands sites.

Documents obtained by Greenpeace, under freedom of information legislation, show that at least 164 other animals died during oil sands operations between 2000 and 2008.

Those animals included 27 bears, 67 deer, 31 foxes and 21 coyotes.

Possible reasons for the deaths are listed as drowning, oil from tailings, animals hitting structure or vehicles, electrocution, and euthanasia of problem wildlife.

Moose, beavers and wolves also died, although the cause of death isn't specified.

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Vancouver eagle chicks hatching online

LaFarge Vancouver Eagle Nest

.slideImage{filter:progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Fade()} Slideshow image David Hancock of the Hancock Wildlife Foundation says two eagles living along Vancouver's waterfront have an impressive track record for rearing young. April 9, 2010. (CTV) By: ctvbc.ca Date: Friday Apr. 9, 2010 6:39 PM PT Bald eagle chicks will be hatching all around the south coast in the coming days — some in more unusual places than others. For years, two eagles have made their nest in one of the few remaining trees along Vancouver's industrial waterfront. Even though the area is noisy, they keep coming back. Read the rest of the story here: http://www.ctvbc.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20100409/bc_eagles_100409/20100409?hub=BritishColumbiaHome

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Darn': Eagle cam catches raven making off with egg

Victoria/Sidney Nest

 

Kristen Thompson

08 April 2010 05:12

An image from the eagle cam at hancockwildlife.org.

People hoping to watch two bald eagle chicks hatch live online got a lesson on the harsh reality of nature when a raven made off with one of the eggs in full view of an eagle cam.

The Hancock Wildlife Foundation installed two tiny cameras in a nest near Sidney on Vancouver Island, and have been streaming the footage on their website.

On Monday, viewers watched live as a raven made quick lunch of one of two eggs while mom was off on errands.

She returned moments later and actually seemed dismayed – throwing her head back and opening her beak – at the sight of the one egg.

Earlier footage showed her and presumably her partner dutifully tending to the nest and two eggs.

Biologist David Hancock, who runs The Hancock Wildlife Foundation, said when he saw the raven with the egg he thought: “Darn.”


Read the rest of the story here:

http://www.metronews.ca/vancouver/local/article/497539--darn-eagle-cam-catches-raven-making-off-with-egg

 

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