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CTV Newscast Features HWF Great Horned Owl Cam

Wildlife News


The CTV news story, featuring our cams on the Great Horned Owl and owlets in the planter on the balcony of a federal building in Victoria, has finally aired.  Of course not many people saw it since it was during the Oscars last night so here is a link where you can watch it.  Our story begins at the 5:23 mark.

http://www.ctvvancouverisland.ca/

Our discussion forum for this camera is here:  http://www.hancockwildlife.org/forum/index.php?forum=107

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Bald eagle crossing signs up along I-95 as strikes becoming more common

Wildlife News

 

In an attempt to keep motorists from hitting eagles, state officials have set up a variable message sign newly set near mile 242 on Interstate 95 in Medway, seen here on Sunday, Feb. 24, 2013.

Nick Sambides Jr.
In an attempt to keep motorists from hitting eagles, state officials have set up a variable message sign newly set near mile 242 on Interstate 95 in Medway, seen here on Sunday, Feb. 24, 2013. Buy Photo
Posted Feb. 23, 2013, at 1:19 p.m.

Bald eagles used to be an endangered species. Now they are numerous enough that state officials are working to keep them from becoming road kill.

The confluence of the Penobscot River, Interstate 95 and Route 11 and the thick woods near them make a seven-mile stretch between Medway and Sherman the deadliest place in all of Maine for the state’s fledgling population of bald eagles, the state’s endangered species biologist says.

The high number of eagles struck by vehicles along I-95 in that area prompted the Maine Department of Transportation about three weeks ago to place large variable-message signs between mile marker 242 in Medway and marker 249 in Sherman warning motorists to avoid eagles they see, said spokesman Ted Talbot.

Read the rest of the story here:  http://bangordailynews.com/2013/02/23/n ... re-common/

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Zoo condors lay first three eggs of season

Wildlife News

 

February 20, 2013 - 12:55pm

First Oregon Zoo condor released to wild is also sitting on an egg

California condors are laying the groundwork for species recovery one egg at a time.

The first three eggs of the 2013 breeding season arrived at the Oregon Zoo's Jonsson Center for Wildlife Conservation over the past week. Malibu laid the first egg Feb. 14, Ojai laid the second yesterday afternoon, and Squapuni laid the third this morning.

"Each new egg is critical to the California condor's comeback," said Kelli Walker, the zoo's lead condor keeper.

The birds and their mates — Maluk, Atishwin and condor No. 189, respectively — will sit on the eggs for up to two weeks before keepers remove them to check whether they are fertile.

Read the rest of the story here:  http://oregonzoo.org/news/2013/02/zoo-c ... ggs-season

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Hancock Planter Owl Cam Featured on CTV 2 Newscast Tonight!!

Wildlife News

 

CTV2 News Victoria came to the office building today where we have our Hancock web cams focused on the Great Horned Owl who has made her home in the planter on the balcony.  Tune in to see the three owlets and watch the interivews.

Shaw Cable subscribers can find CTV2 on channel 12 or 212 HD channels in the Vancouver and Victoria area.  Hopefully there might be something online on the CTV2 website for those out of town viewers to watch.

Our discussion forum for this camera is here:  http://www.hancockwildlife.org/forum/index.php?forum=107

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Wounded but surviving bald eagles -- how are they doing?

Wildlife News

 

Recently I have become aware of a number of eagles flying wild that seem to be doing fine with extensive -- maybe that should be massive -- wounds. My mind quickly goes to old axioms: the survival of the fittest etc. How can an eagle with a missing toe effectively compete? More importantly how could an eagle with basically one foot survive? Others eagles I have run down have obviously been handicapped but were surviving. How do they do this? We might include in this file any noticeable diseases and vagaries of plumage.

So do you have images of hurt, off color or diseased eagles? Let's have a look at them and we will try and explain the anomalies. Here we will also invite any of our rehab followers to report on their unusual arrivals or what they think is the problem -- or solution.

So my challenge to our group is to gather images and videos of "hurt eagles" --- ones that are not perfect. Now that we have a lot of eagle watchers it is possible we can gather some interesting data on this topic. This note is to invite anyone, past and in the future, to send us examples of "hurt" eagles. Please give us some geographical reference - as close as possible -- and a date the image or video was captured. And of course if you have any comments, on the bird's noticeable impairment, etc. or modified behavior, that would be wonderful.  
 

Thanks.

David Hancock 
 

See our new discussion thread with pictures of injured bald eagles here: 

http://www.hancockwildlife.org/forum/viewtopic.php?showtopic=469582

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