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Federal judge blocks Alaska wolf-kill plan

Wolves

State officials sought permission for an aerial hunt on Unimak Island in the Aleutians to save a caribou herd.

June 07, 2010|By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times

Reporting from Seattle — A federal judge in Alaska refused on Monday to allow state officials to launch an aerial wolf hunt on a federal wildlife refuge in the Aleutian Islands, an emergency effort to save a herd of caribou that is on the verge of collapse.

The ruling is the latest chapter in a legal battle between the state and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that erupted after federal wildlife officials threatened to charge state game hunters with trespassing if they entered the refuge and began gunning down wolves.

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Humpback whales form friendships that last years

Humpback whale
Searching for a friendly female?


Humpback whales form lasting bonds, the first baleen whales known to do so.

Individual female humpbacks reunite each summer to feed and swim alongside one another in the Gulf of St Lawrence, off Canada, scientists have found.

Toothed whales, such as sperm whales, associate with one another, but larger baleen whales, which filter their food, have been thought less social.

The finding raises the possibility that commercial whaling may have broken apart social groups of whales.

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Oil spill hits pelicans hard

Planet Earth

By Allen Johnson, AFP June 6, 2010 7:01 AM


Grand Isle, Louisiana, June 5, 2010 (AFP) - The morning after President Barack Obama’s visit to Grand Isle, a wildlife rescue boat slipped past an orange boom at nearby Queen Bess Island, home to thousands of rare brown pelicans and now under attack from a oil spill.

The rookery "is the worst-hit area in the state in terms of wildlife," Michael Carloss, a state biologist said Saturday. "We don’t know about marine life yet because we don’t know how much of the oil is underwater."

 

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Albino crow lands in B.C. wildlife shelter

Wildlife News
An albino crow chick sits on a
perch, June 3rd, at Monika's Wildlife Shelter after being hand fed. The
young chick was dropped off at the Surrey shelter and is being fed every
hour by volunteers.
 
 

An albino crow chick sits on a perch, June 3rd, at Monika's Wildlife Shelter after being hand fed. The young chick was dropped off at the Surrey shelter and is being fed every hour by volunteers.

Photograph by: Ward Perrin, PNG

SURREY, B.C. — A young albino crow is now a permanent resident of Monika's Wildlife Shelter in Surrey.

The male crow, about five weeks old, was turned in to the shelter Wednesday.

Monika Tolksdorf, who runs the centre, says it's not "a total rarity" to find a white crow, but that the bird won't survive if released.

"Usually they die, because most of them go blind because they have no protection from the sun," she says.

www.canada.com/technology/Albino+crow+lands+wildlife+shelter/3113201/story.html

 

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Ely bear cub spotted alive, apparently well

 

It was feared that Hope, abandoned twice by its mother, may not survive without nursing and during the recent cool, wet weather. But Hope has now found the food left for it by researchers Sue Mansfield and Lynn Rogers near trees where the cub spent time with its mother earlier this spring.

By: John Myers, Duluth News Tribune

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