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Albino crow lands in B.C. wildlife shelter

Wildlife News
An albino crow chick sits on a
perch, June 3rd, at Monika's Wildlife Shelter after being hand fed. The
young chick was dropped off at the Surrey shelter and is being fed every
hour by volunteers.
 
 

An albino crow chick sits on a perch, June 3rd, at Monika's Wildlife Shelter after being hand fed. The young chick was dropped off at the Surrey shelter and is being fed every hour by volunteers.

Photograph by: Ward Perrin, PNG

SURREY, B.C. — A young albino crow is now a permanent resident of Monika's Wildlife Shelter in Surrey.

The male crow, about five weeks old, was turned in to the shelter Wednesday.

Monika Tolksdorf, who runs the centre, says it's not "a total rarity" to find a white crow, but that the bird won't survive if released.

"Usually they die, because most of them go blind because they have no protection from the sun," she says.

www.canada.com/technology/Albino+crow+lands+wildlife+shelter/3113201/story.html

 

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Ely bear cub spotted alive, apparently well

 

It was feared that Hope, abandoned twice by its mother, may not survive without nursing and during the recent cool, wet weather. But Hope has now found the food left for it by researchers Sue Mansfield and Lynn Rogers near trees where the cub spent time with its mother earlier this spring.

By: John Myers, Duluth News Tribune

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Close encounter with a bizarre venomous beast

Dr Richard Young gets up close with one of the world's weirdest mammals

Conservationists are in the Dominican Republic to save one of the world's strangest and most ancient mammals - the Hispaniolan solenodon.

After days of searching, the team finally tracks down one of the bizarre beasts.

A shout from the forest sounds, bursting through the night chorus of frog tinks and cricket chirrups.

"They've got one, they've got one," someone yells.

It is the middle of the night, and local research assistants Nicolas Corona and Lleyo Espinal have been trawling the dense forest vegetation, attempting to track down the elusive Hispaniolan solenodon.

They need complete silence to find the animals: they pinpoint them by listening for the sounds of rustling leaves as the little creatures scuttle across the forest floor.


 

 

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A Song for Spirit, the Blinded Golden Eagle

Wildlife News

By Heath McCoy, Calgary Herald

June 1, 2010

 

 

 

Ian Tyson doesn’t just collaborate with anybody.

Sure, the 76-year-old country-folk music icon broke into the business with his former wife Sylvia Tyson in the ’60s, and Ian & Sylvia became giants of that era’s folk movement. And, in recent years Tyson has also performed with the CPO and recorded with Corb Lund.

But working with grades 1 and 2 students from the arts immersion school Calgary Arts Academy? Nobody saw that coming.

Even so, Tyson’s latest recording, A Song For Spirit, is a worthy and touching folk anthem and we owe it all to a blinded bird.


Read more:

http://www.calgaryherald.com/entertainment/Tyson+inspired+students+powerful+song/3099900/story.html

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'Noise pollution' threatens fish

Planet Earth
By Matt Walker
Editor, Earth News
Cichlid fish
Sound matters to cichlids


Fish are being threatened by rising levels of man-made noise pollution.

So say scientists who have reviewed the impact on fish species around the world of noises made by oil and gas rigs, ships, boats and sonar.

Rather than live in a silent world, most fish hear well and sound plays an active part in their lives, they say.

Increasing noise levels may therefore severely affect the distribution of fish, and their ability to reproduce, communicate and avoid predators.

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