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No Endangered Species Legislation in British Columbia

Conservation & Preservation

Take Action

 Many people are shocked to find out that BC, along with Alberta, is one of only two provinces in Canada with no endangered species legislation to protect wildlife at risk, such as grizzly bears, Great Blue Herons, and rare desert plants. By taking action today - you can help change that.

You are in good company: polls show that over 85 percent of British Columbians want a law that will protect the 1900 species at risk that call this province home. The petition signatures will be forwarded to the leaders of all political parties in British Columbia.

After you have signed this petition, pass the link onto five of your friends.  Together we can make sure that BC remains the Best Place on Earth!

Please sign the petition now!

Protect BC's Precious Wildlife Now

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Guichon Creek: back from the brink

Conservation & Preservation

Guichon Creek is a familiar and much-loved Burnaby campus landmark. Fish, Wildlife, and Recreation students study it and work to restore it. Staff and local residents enjoy its calming presence. Wildlife flocks to it.

But it wasn’t always this way. In this new video, Mark Angelo, award-winning conservationist and chair of the Rivers Institute at BCIT, shares the story of Guichon Creek, pre-restoration.

“When I first saw Guichon Creek almost 40 years ago it had been severely degraded,” he says. “It had been stripped of streamside vegetation, water quality was poor; it had been converted to almost a lifeless drainage canal.”

Since that time, efforts by BCIT; Fish, Wildlife, and Recreation students; the Rivers Institute; City of Burnaby; and countless volunteers have turned that drainage canal into a thriving urban stream.

To read the rest of the story and watch the video please visit this link

Guichon Creek has Fish once again

 

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Bald eagles flock to Chehalis-Harrison River estuary

Wildlife News

 

 
 
A bald eagle flies over the Harrison River near Harrison Mills in the Fraser Valley November 17.
 

A bald eagle flies over the Harrison River near Harrison Mills in the Fraser Valley November 17.

Photograph by: Ric Ernst, Vancouver Sun

Thousands of bald eagles descended on the Chehalis-Harrison River estuary earlier than usual last weekend because of a devastating lack of chum on the coast further north.

David Hancock, of the Hancock Wildlife Foundation, estimated about 2,500 eagles showed up for the 15th annual Bald Eagle Festival — the most ever spotted at this time of year.

Read the rest of the story here:

Eagles at the Estuary!

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Lake of the Ozarks Eagles Cam


Bio of Elsie & Einstein.
This cam, showing "Elsie & Einstein", the Lake of the Ozarks Eagles, is located in Central Missouri,USA.
The cam is an Axis 214 PTZ mounted inside of an upside down 15 gallon aquarium, with small heater and thermometer on a platform 40' off the ground.

 

Our much appreciated thanks goes to Jim Ray (aka: our own thumper59) for sharing this camera with us.

 

 

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WEB PHOTO SPECIAL: Bald Eagles Take Flight

Wildlife News

 

 
 
During a jet boat tour with Fraser River Safari on Wednesday, noted biologist David Hancock of the Hancock Wildlife Foundation talks about the thousands of bald eagles that return to the Harrison River to feast on salmon carcasses every year.
 

During a jet boat tour with Fraser River Safari on Wednesday, noted biologist David Hancock of the Hancock Wildlife Foundation talks about the thousands of bald eagles that return to the Harrison River to feast on salmon carcasses every year.

Photograph by: Paul J. Henderson, for the TIMES

Dozens of bald eagles are currently descending upon the Harrison and Fraser rivers every day to feast on millions of salmon carcasses that have spawned in recent weeks.

While this year's large sockeye run has received a lot of media attention, low numbers of salmon returned to many other river systems up the coast of British Columbia bring the annual bald eagles to Chilliwack's back yard by the hundreds.

"The eagles have come in very early and in very large numbers," said David Hancock, a noted wildlife biologist and founder of the Hancock Wildlife Foundation.

Read the rest of the story here:

Eagles take Flight

 

 

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