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Planet Earth and What We're Doing - And How To Fix It

Planet Earth

I created the "Planet Earth" topic because I just finished reading an article from Wired Planet called "Terraforming Earth: How to Wreck a Planet in 3,000 Years (Part 1)"

Hancock Wildlife Foundation is built upon the work of David Hancock, whom I've known for over 25 years now. We've spent long hours talking about our views on what man is doing to this planet and we come at the topic from two very different backgrounds and initially with two very different points of view.

Without putting words in David's mouth, I think I can characterize him as part of the solution instead of part of the problem - at least as much as possible within the limits of also being able to affect real change in as many people as he can. He might have been like some and gone "off grid" to live in isolation but "environmentally friendly" - but no, he's done other things and helped in other ways.

David early on was close to the birds he's most known for his teaching and researching about. He's watched the demise of species in many areas and participated in the re-introduction of them from stocks he's caught and raised personally. He believes in zero population growth as being fundamental to fixing the most basic problems of our planet - that of man's continued expansion at the peril of the other inhabitants of the planet; the fish, birds, mammals, insects etc. Nothing but the complete halt in population growth will make enough difference in the long term to save our planet from devastating consequences of the things we are doing to it. 

I, on the other hand, come from a background of the typical middle-class North American family of the mid to late 20th century: 2.5 children per family (I'm one of 3 brothers and I have 2 sons myself now) and always striving to have bigger and better things to play with. I have a technical bent and read a lot of science fiction. Maybe I've been biased to ignore the planet's plight by my perception that science can either solve the immediate problem or provide a long-term solution in the form of new planets we can expand to as we out-grow this one.

The problem is, no scientific solution is going to happen soon enough.

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Bald eagles released from death grip

Wildlife News

 

 

Last Updated: Friday, September 24, 2010 | 8:02 AM

These two eagles were locked together on a lawn outside Charlottetown and allowed people to approach them.These two eagles were locked together on a lawn outside Charlottetown and allowed people to approach them. (Sheila Stretch)

Wildlife officials on P.E.I. released two battling bald eagles that had locked their talons together on the weekend.

'I had a horned owl that actually put its talons right through my left hand, in three places. I know what it feels like.'— Gerald MacDougall, wildlife manager

The eagles were discovered Saturday night on a front lawn by people arriving at a party in Long Creek, just west of Charlottetown.

"They were in distress because they were flopping trying to get apart," said Leith Stretch, one of the people who discovered the birds.



Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/prince-edward-island/story/2010/09/24/pei-eagles-locked-rescued-584.html#socialcomments#ixzz10T0ngKeR
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Live From the Nest

 

 
 
 
 
Biologist David Hancock installs two cameras trained on an eagle’s nest in a cottonwood tree at Pacific Coast Terminals in Port Moody. The Hancock Wildlife Foundation performed the installation Tuesday in advance of next year’s nesting season, when people can view the local eagle hatchlings online.
 

Biologist David Hancock installs two cameras trained on an eagle’s nest in a cottonwood tree at Pacific Coast Terminals in Port Moody. The Hancock Wildlife Foundation performed the installation Tuesday in advance of next year’s nesting season, when people can view the local eagle hatchlings online.

Photograph by: Paul vanPeenen, NOW photos

http://www.thenownews.com/community/LIVE+FROM+NEST/3564353/story.html

 

 

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New Cameras Installed - White Rock

September 16, 2010 - a crew from Hancock Wildlife Foundation helped place two new Axis 1346E cameras in place to allow us to view the eagles in this nest on private property.

While not yet up and viewable, the cameras are in place and functioning just fine on this bluff overlooking Boundary Bay to the West of White Rock, on the South-West coast of Beautiful British Columbia.

We're hoping to have the camera up and viewable shortly. In the mean time read on for some of the images taken that day, now in the site's Media Gallery album.

 

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New Cameras Installed - Port Moody PCT Eagle Nest

September 21, 2010 - This morning a crew arrived at the Pacific Coast Terminals facility in Port Moody to install two Axis 1346E fixed-focus high-definition cameras aimed at the eagle nest in a grove of cottonwood trees near the gate/guard facility.

One of our members, urban Eagle, has been submitting pictures to our discussion forum since May this year like the one seen to the left here.

The nest is right in the middle of a busy industrial area with trains going by and shunting sulphur and chemical cars at all hours of the day.

Note that the picture the left was taken last breeding season. There were no eagles in the area when we put the cameras in.

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