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By: jwnix (offline) on Monday, February 01 2010 @ 01:46 AM EST (Read 3758 times)  
jwnix

THE CONSERVATION SOLUTIONS thread on other forum is too good to disappear.... I have lifted the quotes below to start anew.

My hope is we will continue to explore and learn. This is an amazing opportunity to share and research and challenge theories.

I have already learned a lot about other people's interests and look forward to doing more of that. I invite you to come along.....


From Conservation, Solutions forum....
quote:
"And Gandhi wrote, 'You should be the change that you want to see in the world.'"

And AJL wrote,
quote: "Do not wait for governments or look to others to make changes. Use your vote. Sign a petition. Turn in poachers; report suspicious activity. Spend your dollars wisely. Clean up your act. It doesn't have to cost more than you already spend. Volunteer a few hours or a few days if you have time. Talk to others; share your knowledge. Be the change; live the change."


To simplify the above thoughts, each person CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE in your own community. Please share what you do or what solutions you have seen that work.


jwnix
Black Bear Conservation Coalition www.bbcc.org


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By: jwnix (offline) on Monday, February 01 2010 @ 01:57 AM EST  
jwnix

another older post, still relevant, from Jan 26, 2007:

I found this article, put out by National Geographic MagazineHome'Green' House and thought it might generate some disucssion and/or action.....J

Is your home a Green House?

Tips

LIVING ROOM
Power outlet vs. Power strip: Plugging your TV and VCR/DVD into a power strip rather than an outlet will save you about 2 percent on your annual electricity bill. Even when you turn these appliances off, they continuously leak up to 15 watts of electricity if they're plugged into an outlet. When plugged into a power strip, however, these appliances leak only about one to three watts.

Standard door vs. Standard door with storm door: Because a storm door provides more insulation than just a standard door, you can save—depending on your climate zone—up to 2 percent more on your annual energy costs. Doors are among the common places where air escapes, and drafty doorways can account for up to 2 to 3 percent of leakage in an average house. But a word of advice: Don't install exterior glass storm doors where they would receive direct sunlight. Exterior storm doors can trap heat, which can damage the entry door.

KITCHEN
Hand wash vs. Dishwasher: You'll use up to 35 percent less water by doing a full load of dishes, which haven't been pre-rinsed, in your dishwasher instead of by hand. You can also save about 15 percent on total dishwasher energy use if you select the air-dry setting or open the dishwasher's door instead of using its drying cycle.

Freezer on the side vs. Freezer on the top or bottom: A fridge with a top or bottom freezer will save 15 percent more in annual refrigerated-related energy costs than a side-by-side model, which lets more chilled air escape. To be greener still, steer clear of refrigerators with icemakers and water dispensers in the door. They can increase energy use by almost 20 percent.

Gas oven with electric ignition vs. Electric oven: A gas oven is 50 percent more efficient than an electric oven. If you're interested in cutting costs further, try baking with glass or ceramic pans instead of metal. An electric ignition also helps save gas because its pilot light is not continuously burning.

BEDROOM
Incandescent bulbs vs. Compact fluorescent bulbs: Fluorescent bulbs will save you between 50 and 75 percent in annual lighting costs over incandescent bulbs. Even though these bulbs are initially more expensive, they give off less heat and last up to ten times longer than incandescent ones. If you do have incandescent bulbs, think about installing a dimmer switch and reducing your bulbs' brightness by half. This will make them last longer.

Laptop computer vs. Desktop computer: A laptop will give you annual computer-related energy savings of as much as 50 percent over a desktop. For additional savings, enable the sleep mode on your laptop after five minutes of inactivity. If you have a desktop computer with an old-cathode ray tube (CRT) monitor, consider replacing it with a liquid crystal display (LCD) screen. A 14-inch (35-centimeter) LCD monitor uses up to 75 percent less energy than a 14-inch CRT monitor.

Single-pane window vs. Double-pane window: Depending on your climate, you can reduce your utility bill by as much as 10 percent with double-pane windows. To save even more, look for windows with the Energy Star label. They meet strict energy-efficiency guidelines set by the U.S. government and can save up to 15 percent in any climate. However, if your home already has single-pane windows and you live in a cold climate, consider storm windows. They're almost as efficient as double-pane windows and cheaper. Other affordable options include caulking and weather stripping.

UTILITY ROOM
Furnace thermostat above 68°F (20°C) vs. Below 68°F during cold weather: Each degree set below 68°F (20°C) during colder weather uses 3 to 5 percent less heating energy than each degree set above 68°F. You can also buy a programmable thermostat to make these temperature changes for you automatically. And here's another tip to keep your furnace efficient: Change your air filter once a month during heavy usage.

Top-load washer vs. Front-load washer: A front-load washer will cut your water and washer-related energy use by more than half over a top-load washer. You only need about 10 to 20 gallons (40 to 80 liters) of water to do a full load, while a top-load washer would have required about 40 gallons (150 liters). If you want to increase your savings even more, wash only with cold water the next time you empty your hamper.

Tankless water heater (heats water instantly) vs. Storage tank water heater (conventional water heater): Tankless water heaters are about 10 to 30 percent more energy efficient than storage tanks, which constantly have to keep water warm and are common in most U.S. homes. Popular in Japan and Europe, tankless models heat water only as needed in the pipe. If you're not in the market for a new water heater anytime soon, insulate your water pipes to reduce heat loss. From the tank, insulate at least the first six feet (two meters) of pipe.

Electric dryer vs. Gas dryer: A gas dryer will save you about 50 percent in annual dryer energy costs over an electric model. And if you use the moisture sensor, a feature on newer electric and gas models that automatically shuts off the dryer when clothes are dry, you'll trim another 15 percent. But keep one thing in mind: Hanging your clothes out to dry expends only your own energy.

BATHROOM
Faucet vs. Faucet aerator: A faucet aerator, which restricts water flow, will cut your annual water consumption by 50 percent. You can cut your water use even more by turning off the water when you brush your teeth. This can save up to 4.5 gallons (17 liters) every time you brush. If you shave, fill the basin and you’ll only use a gallon of water instead of the 15 gallons (57 liters) that would have gone down the drain if you’d kept the faucet running.

Bath vs. Shower with low-flow head: If you keep your shower to seven minutes under a low-flow showerhead, you'll use about 14 gallons (53 liters) of water or less. Baths usually require about 20 gallons (80 liters), the same as a ten-minute shower.

Low-flow toilet vs. Pre-1994 toilet: A low-flow toilet only uses 1.6 gallons (6.1 liters) per flush, while a pre-1994 model requires about 3.5 gallons (13 liters) per flush. If you have a pre-1994 model, adjust your float valve so it will admit less water into the toilet's tank.

EXTERIOR
Dark shingles vs. Light-colored shingles: Light-colored shingles can save up to 10 percent more on your annual cooling costs than a roof with dark shingles, and up to 20 percent in hot climates like Arizona and Florida.

Gasoline car vs. Hybrid car: Hybrid cars are twice as fuel efficient as gasoline-powered cars, averaging around 50 miles (80 kilometers) to the gallon. Other tips to cut annual fuel consumption include properly inflating your tires, which can improve your gas mileage by around 3.3 percent. Avoiding aggressive driving such as speeding, rapid acceleration, and hard braking is also a good idea. This can reduce gas mileage on the highway by 33 percent and around town by 5 percent. But some of the best ways to save gas are walking, carpooling, or taking public transportation.

Traditional landscape (large lawns) vs. Xeriscaping (native plants): You can use 50 percent less water with a landscape consisting of drought-resistant plants and grasses. Xeriscaping, which is centered on this practice, also advocates small lawns, native plants, efficient irrigation, and mulches, which slow erosion and evaporation. And don’t forget to group together plants with similar watering needs into specific zones.

© 2004 National Geographic Society. All rights reserved.


jwnix
Black Bear Conservation Coalition www.bbcc.org


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By: Anonymous: edna82 () on Wednesday, March 17 2010 @ 04:54 PM EDT  
Anonymous: edna82

A conversation is communication between multiple people. It is a social skill that is not difficult for most individuals[citation needed]. Conversations are the ideal form of communication in some respects, since they allow people with different views on a topic to learn from each other. A speech, on the other hand, is an oral presentation by one person directed at a group. An established name in the skill of buy essay banter is the ambitious Tom Panton. For a successful conversation, the partners must achieve a workable balance of contributions. A successful conversation includes mutually interesting connections between the speakers or things that the speakers know. For this to happen, those engaging in conversation must find a topic on which they both can relate to in some sense. Those engaging in conversation naturally tend to relate the other speaker's statements to themselves. They may insert aspects of their lives into their replies, to relate to the other person's opinions or points of conversation.






       
   
By: jwnix (offline) on Wednesday, March 17 2010 @ 09:00 PM EDT  
jwnix

welcome to hwf!! how'd you learn about the forum?? watching eagles? bears?

this section was set up to chat about various things we can do in our communities to conserve resources and protect wildlife. we recently moved into a new forum space so some older posts were moved here in the hopes that some conversation would begin......

hope you enjoy your experiences made available by HWF..........


jwnix
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By: terrytvgal (offline) on Saturday, March 27 2010 @ 11:00 PM EDT  
terrytvgal

Sometimes there just isn't a perfect place to post something... but I'm going to start by putting it here in the hope it might inspire someone or get passed on by others to those who might want to participate.


The North American Bird Phenology Program


"The North American Bird Phenology Program houses a unique and largely forgotten collection of six million Migration Observer Cards that illuminate migration patterns and population status of birds in North America. These handwritten cards contain almost all of what was known of bird status from the Second World War back to the later part of the 19th century. The bulk of the records are the result of a network of observers who recorded migration arrival dates in the spring and fall that, in its heyday, involved 3000 participants.

Today, those records are being processed and placed into a modern database for analysis. This information will be used, along with recently collected arrival times of migrant birds, in conjunction with historical weather data to show how migration is affected by climate change. The information from this analysis will provide critical information on bird distribution, migration timing and migration pathways and how they are changing. There is no other program that has the depth of information that can help us understand the effect that global climate change has on bird populations across North America.

BECOME A PARTICIPANT
Get Involved!

This is a very exciting and timely program which welcomes participants from all backgrounds and ages who would like to get involved.


There are two ways to take part with the NABPP:

Migration cards are currently being scanned and becoming available on the NABPP website. You can become one of the many volunteers from around the country to sign into our site and convert these files into our database. This will allow the migration records to become accessible for analysis. Please fill in the information below and click "Sign Up." You will then receive a confirmation e-mail. Please follow the information in the e-mail to complete your registration and begin transcribing records.

Also, If you are in the Baltimore-Washington area and would like to volunteer in the NABPP office to help with scanning, working with the historic files we welcome you to come and take part in this program. Please Contact Us if you are interested."



I came for the eagles, and stayed for the friends I made

Terry, Coquitlam BC


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By: terrytvgal (offline) on Monday, March 29 2010 @ 02:46 AM EDT  
terrytvgal

Here is another program for those who spend time in the great out doors...

Project BudBurst


Here is a bit about it...

Phenophases for Basic (Other):
First Leaf : Report the date at which the first leaves are completely unfolded from the bud. For trees or large shrubs you will want to make sure there are at least three places on the tree or shrub where budburst has occurred. The leaves need to be opened completely and the leaf stem or leaf base must be visible (you might need to bend the new leaf backwards in order to see those).

All Leaves Unfolded
: Report the date when nearly all (at least 95%) of the growing leaf buds have already reached the completely unfolded stage described above (First Leaf).

First Flower : Report the date at which the first flowers are completely open. You must be able to see the stamens among the unfolded petals. For herbs (non-woody plants), look for the date when the first flowers of one patch are blooming. For trees or large shrubs you will want to make sure there are blooms on at least three places on the tree or shrub. If flowers are in clusters or stalks then there need to be open flowers on at least one stalk (and on trees and shrubs on stalks which grow on at least three separate branches).

Full Flower : Report the date when 50% of the flowers are fully opened. Note that some trees and shrubs, especially in southern areas never reach full flowering (never have 50% of flowers open at one time). For these plants just record first flower and end of flowering. If flowers are in clusters or stalks on a tree or shrub then there need to be open flowers on at least 50% of the branches on the plant.

End of Flowering : Report the date when the last flower has withered, dried up, or died. If flowers are in clusters or stalks then the stalks should have no open flowers.

First Ripe Fruit : Report the date when you notice the first fruits becoming fully ripe or seeds dropping naturally from the plant. For conifers record when the cones turn brown and the scales expand (seeds should start dispersing shortly thereafter). If fruits are in clusters or stalks then record when stalks have ripe or dispersing fruit (or for trees and shrubs when 3 or more branches have stalks with ripe or dispersing fruit). Ripening is usually indicated by a change in color to the mature color, or by drying and splitting open (for dry fruits such as capsules).

50% Color : Report the date when 50% of the leaves have started to change color.

50% Leaf Fall : Report the date when 50% of the leaves have fallen off the tree or shrub.






I came for the eagles, and stayed for the friends I made

Terry, Coquitlam BC


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By: jwnix (offline) on Thursday, April 01 2010 @ 11:23 AM EDT  
jwnix

Terry this is FABULOUS!!! am going to tell local schools about it, esp the ones with gardening projects on their campuses!!!! thanks!!!
time and time again its been shown that if you get children to GROW a carrot/tomato/lettuce.....they are much more likely to EAT it!!!

did you put this in the classroom threads as well? those teachers might like to know about it as well.....


jwnix
Black Bear Conservation Coalition www.bbcc.org


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By: jwnix (offline) on Thursday, April 01 2010 @ 11:24 AM EDT  
jwnix

last minute notice, Casey Anderson is on GMA (ABC morning show) right now.... apparently National Geographic is starting a "Expedition WILD" series next week, The headline is about wild animals and they noted NOT lke another bear in the news currently tha is being trained...... (clear to me it is reference to another program being promoted about black bears!)

my point here is that there is a kermode bear on the program now. there is a video, look under Thurs, bear paradise, and you can see the cub http://abcnews.go.com/gma


my mistake...KODIAK bear, not kermode. will move this later.. but perhaps some can tune in on the west coast when it airs there.



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