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 Hornby Island ~ 2012 Bald Eagle Nest Cam
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By: JudyB (offline) on Thursday, September 08 2011 @ 09:58 AM EDT (Read 203852 times)  
JudyB

Thanks to Doug & Sheila Carrick for sharing this intimate look into the lives of a wonderful pair of eagles with the world.

Discussion, Observation, Screenshots & Videos -- Hornby Island Bald Eagle Nest

Link to the Hornby Island Bald Eagle Cam - coming soon

This thread is set up to provide a place to talk about things directly related to what's happening at the Hornby nest. We'd prefer that all chatting took place in the Garden Fence Chat Area, and would be happy to set up a "Friends of Hornby" (or whatever name you choose) thread in the Chat area if there's interest. Screenshots and photos and/or links to videos are welcome in this thread as part of the discussion; if you link to someone else's work, please give appropriate credit along with the link.

Because this camera may be watched by school classes and we encourage children to visit the forum to learn about eagles, we will be following a strict interpretation of our basic "no obscenity" rule, and we would appreciate your not using even the mild expletives and descriptions of bodily functions - gosh and golly are permitted - please consider some mythical maiden aunt or uncle looking at the forum with their great niece or nephew before using anything stronger.

"Poop" is an allowed word when referring to something done by an eaglet. We know that some words which describe bodily functions are also used as casual slang in some areas - but because they are considered far more impolite in some regions than others, we may change them to family-friendly alternatives. No PM is required because notice is being given here.

There is to be no discussion of politics or religion. And there is to be absolutely no personal attacks or bullying. All opinions are welcome and everyone's point of view is to be respected.

This is to some extent a self-regulating forum - and we all need your help to keep the forum running smoothly. If you see a post that has language that might upset a school board or that seems impolite or disrespectful to another person - please bring the post to our attention.

Thank you for your help!

2011-2012 Season:



Restricted Rights for This Content: The Hornby Island Eagle Nest video stream and all archives is Copyright 2011, Doug Carrick. All rights are reserved. Inclusion of the contents of this stream in any web site is prohibited unless written permission from Doug Carrick is obtained beforehand.
Screen captures and video clips of the content of this screen are licensed for display only under written permission of Doug Carrick. Hancock Wildlife Foundation (HWF) has obtained this permission and therefor all HWF members may capture and post clips and stills via the HWF web facilities and such other HWF sanctioned and administered facilities on such other sites as Facebook, YouTube, LiveStream, etc., under the HWF accounts.

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By: JudyB (offline) on Thursday, September 08 2011 @ 10:31 AM EDT  
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This nest has streaming video with two cams, one a close view of the nest, the other further back; the internet connection from the nest can currently only handle one stream at a time, so the view may switch back and forth on occasion. or one stream may appear as a small box in the corner of the primary stream.

The nest is located about 30 meters (100 feet) up an evergreen tree, and is situated on private property about 100 meters from the ocean on Hornby Island in the Strait of Georgia between Vancouver Island and the British Columbia mainland. According to Doug Carrick, the eagles built their first nest in the fall of 1989 and fledged their first eaglet in 1990. 2012 will be their twenty-third year of nesting; they have fledged 20 eaglets in 22 years - just under one a year, which is considered average for eagles in this area. There has been a camera in the nest since September 2004, and it was first connected to the internet in spring 2006. The pair laid two eggs in 2006, neither of which hatched; the camera was offline in 2007 after the line was damaged in a winter storm but Doug reported that they raised and fledged two eaglets (Thunder and Lightning) that year; they did not lay any eggs in 2008. In 2009, they laid two eggs, both of which hatched; the younger eaglet Echo died in a freak accident, after becoming tangled in the female's feathers; older eaglet Hope fledged successfully.

In 2010 they laid two eggs - one of which hatched to produce Phoenix. She was at the flapping/branching stage when she developed a lung infection - which proved fatal. The immediate cause of death was acute bilateral mycotic pneumonia; additional tests were conducted to determine if there were underlying conditions that contributed to her demise, and the final cause of death was acute aspergillosis. They also laid two eggs in 2011, both of which hatched; the eaglets, named Alexandra for Alexandra Morton and David for David Suzuki, both fledged successfully.

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By: JudyB (offline) on Thursday, September 08 2011 @ 10:38 AM EDT  
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Doug Carrick's Eagle Timetable


Doug Carrick compiled these dates from 13 years of observing approximately 15 different breeding territories.

RETURN FROM MIGRATION – October 2, give or take 3 days.

MAJOR NEST BUILDING TIME
- From October 20 to November 15. Bringing branches to nest, large ones around the outside and fine twigs on the inside.

WINTER SURVIVAL TIME - November 15 to January 31. With shorter and colder days, nest-building stops. Much of their time is spent getting food, mostly fish but also winter-weakened birds and ducks.

MATING - Think of St Valentine’s Day, February 14 (a suitable time for mating) – but include the two weeks before and after this date – in other words, the whole month of February. Eagles are also seen mating in the first half of March, just a week or two before laying eggs But at no other times in the year.

FINAL NEST PREPARATION - A second flurry of nest-preparation takes place from mid-February to mid-March – adding more branches, followed by soft materials like dry grass and moss.

EGG LAYING - March 25, plus or minus one week. A second egg 2 or 3 days later.

BROODING – The male and female take turns sitting on the eggs for approximately 35 days – from March 25 to May 1, plus or minus one week. One could consider the month of April as the “brooding” month.

CHICKS HATCH - May 1, plus or minus one week.

CHICK DEVELOPMENT - Peeps can be heard by June 10 - Sitting on edge of nest by June 20 - Flapping wings by June 25 - Flapping and Jumping by July 10

FIRST FLIGHT - July 25, plus or minus one week. (85 days after hatching)

MIGRATION OFF ISLAND
– from mid-August to September. This migration includes adults, new eaglets and any other non-breeding eagles. All eagles go.

ADULT EAGLES (0NLY) RETURN TO ISLAND - October 2, plus or minus one week

IMMATURES STRAGGLE BACK TO ISLAND - One or two arrive back in November, a few in December and increasing numbers in the next few months.

Dates will be earlier for nests in southern Vancouver Island and the Fraser Valley and later in northern Vancouver Island and up the coast

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By: JudyB (offline) on Thursday, September 08 2011 @ 12:03 PM EDT  
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A BRIEF HISTORY OF HORNBY ISLAND

Ten thousand years ago, three thousand years after the last glacier retreated, the receding seas started slowly to reveal Hornby Island with much the same shape that it is today. Vegetation started to grow and by five thousand years ago people from Deep Bay were visiting the Island gathering the Island's bounty and fishing from its shores.

Hornby Island and its surrounds, immediately prior to the advent of western civilization, was the territory of the Pentlatch, a people belonging to the Coast Salish group of West Coast people. They and their ancestors, being semi-nomadic, used the Island seasonally and cyclically nine months of the year and became part of the Island's ecosystem. The island could provide for nearly all their needs.


To read more, go here...

click here>>>HISTORY OF HORNBY ISLAND

A geographical map of present day Hornby Island...




Ma and Pa's territory is approximately from Grassy Point on the north to Hidden Bay to the south (red rectangle)

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By: JudyB (offline) on Thursday, September 08 2011 @ 12:07 PM EDT  
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(thanks to nightowl for the following information)

HOW TO TELL THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN MA AND PA


Physical

Ma is bigger than Pa (usually females are bigger by about 30%)
She has a 'part' in the back of the white feathers on her head, and some lighter brown feathers on her back.
Ma's head feathers look like she's having a 'bad hair day' (more ruffled) as opposed to Pa's sleeker 'Brycreem' look.

Behavioral

If there is any 'beaking' (pecking of the other) it's usually Ma beaking Pa.
Pa usually defers to Ma by going to an outer branch after beaking or moves aside, out of her way.
note: these are not scientific observations, but my own

[We hope to add new comparison pictures once the eagles return]

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By: nightowl (offline) on Thursday, September 08 2011 @ 12:19 PM EDT  
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HORNBY ISLAND NEST MAP

Click on image to download

Doug Carrick ~ April, 2008:

The above map shows all the eagle nests I have known on Hornby Island. Many of these nests are now abandoned and some have fallen out of the trees. Our nest, the one on the web-cam, is Number 10 at Grassy Point. The close-up camera is aimed south-east, picking up Sandstone Point and a bit of Tralee Point in the distance. Vancouver is another 70 miles in that direction, but cannot be seen. The two points can best be seen at low tide.



DETAIL MAP OF GRASSY POINT

Click on image to download

Doug Carrick ~ April, 2008:

There are lots all along the waterfront, each going back 200 feet from the sea. Then there is a road with a 66 foot allowance. The nest tree is inland another 60 feet, making a total of 326 feet from the sea. The waterfront lots all have houses or cabins on them, but most for summer or weekend use only. In developing the area a minimum number of trees have been taken down so from the eagles point of view, it is like looking down on a forest, with a few small clearings.

The eagles' main perch tree is the Peters' Tree, next door. Next most important is the Babysitting Tree just 70 feet from the nest. Being a taller tree than the Nest Tree, the eagles can sit there and keep an eye on the chicks. Their territory extends southward to the Leaning Tree on Sandstone Point and Northwards to the His and Hers Tree. This tree has split into two tops where the eagles are often seen sitting on their respective tops. The next eagle neighbours south are the Nomads (who have settled down). Their main perch tree is the Flat-top Tree. The water seen on the close-up camera is just off Hidden Bay. The Big Rock is the home station to George and Alice, our resident gulls, along with a great number of cormorants.



Thanks Doug!


member since May 9, 2006


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By: nightowl (offline) on Thursday, September 08 2011 @ 12:20 PM EDT  
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reserved


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By: Anonymous: Doug Carrick () on Tuesday, October 11 2011 @ 11:23 AM EDT  
Anonymous: Doug Carrick

It has happened at last. Dad Hornby is back! I checked the Peters' Tree at 8 o'clock this morning and there he was, sitting in his proper position, looking down. I asked him where Mom was, but he didn't say. We'll have to wait a little longer.

So much for my theory about wind direction. It is still a southeasterly wind, but dad came back anyway. Oh mayby I can salvage my theory a bit and say that the "wrong-way winds" delayed his return. How does that sound?





       
   



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