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 Questions to Biologist David Hancock: to be answered during a live broadcast and/or posted here.
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By: karenbills (offline) on Friday, June 10 2011 @ 06:00 PM EDT (Read 1486 times)  
karenbills

Send your questions to:

karen@hancockwildlife.org as Karen will coordinate them for David and Richard's live broadcasts.


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By: karenbills (offline) on Friday, June 10 2011 @ 06:17 PM EDT  
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Question: How do Nestlings Learn Hunting and Social Skills?

DAVID HANCOCK'S ANSWER:

This was earlier a big question in my mind because in my wilderness observations of nesting eagles the learning seemed to be restricted to what they could see from the nest. The chicks were always abandoned by 5 - 7 days after fledging with literally no teaching. The maximal observed learning was the eaglet viewing an adult catching something at a distance and occasionally attacking that adult for the dinner at the delivery of the food or on a nearby beach once the eaglet had fledged. I never saw adults bring food to the fledglings in the nest or to nearby trees.

Read the rest of David's answer here:

article.php/Question-HowDoNestlingsLearnHuntingAndSo





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By: karenbills (offline) on Friday, June 17 2011 @ 06:14 PM EDT  
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Question: If one eagle in a nest comes down with Trichomoniasis, does this mean the others will also get it and die?

DAVID HANCOCK'S ANSWER:

Indeed sad. One bird coming down with Trich does not mean that other siblings or other generations in the same nest will get it. While this protozoan invades many species, and therefore has great opportunity to mutate for "the bad", our eagles have a lot of generations of developing resistance to such bugs.

I suspect our eaglet came down with some other debilitating problem and this reduced the eaglet's resistance, in this case, to the ever-present Trich.

If eagles became very susceptible to Trichamonas then at the big concentrations of eagles, Chehalis or the dump, we would likely see a great many deaths -- and we do not see this.

Thanks.

David


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