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 Red-Tailed Hawk - Franklin Institute, PA
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By: soph9 (offline) on Monday, January 18 2010 @ 10:51 AM EST (Read 32395 times)  
soph9

2015 Seasson

"T1" has found a 3rd mate"T3" and appears to be setting up housekeeping in a new (old) nest. Read about it HERE.



2014 Season

It looks like there will not be a cam this season. Saddly it is believed the resident male "T2" was killed when hit by a train while he was hunting prey. There are two young males currently courting the female; however, Mom has not made her mind up yet and time for egg laying is quickly running out!

Click HERE to read the latest update.

2014 Link to the Cam page

About the Nest

In January, the hawks began to construct the outer shell of a nest by positioning sticks on the ledge. Before they were able to complete their project, however, strong winds knocked the structure from the ledge. After consulting with experts at the nearby Academy of Natural Sciences and the Pennsylvania Game Commission to learn that the hawks would not abandon the nest if humans intervened, The Franklin Institute's staff carpenter added a wooden extension to the ledge and replaced the nest. The Institute also consulted with the Pennsylvania State Game Commission to make sure the intervention was in line with state laws. The hawks seemed to like the added security of their deluxe new perch and returned to complete their project. The nest is now quite large and dense, padded with found materials including some small pine branches.
About the Hawks

The Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) is the most common hawk in North America. It is a large bird with a broad, red tail. The female is usually larger than the male. It appears that a male and a female are co-constructing the nest at The Franklin Institute. Red-tailed Hawks are monogamous, meaning that a hawk will choose one mate and stay with that mate for life.

Philadelphia provides a suitable year-round habitat for Red-tailed Hawks. They can be found in open areas with elevated perches where they sit and watch for their prey. They are meat-eaters and feed on small to medium-sized mammals and birds. In an urban area such as Philadelphia, that would certainly include rodents, although these particular hawks are most commonly observed to be feeding on pigeons.

The Red-tailed Hawk builds its nest in a tall tree or other elevated perch. The nest is a circular assembly of sticks and twigs, lined with softer pieces. It appears that The Franklin's hawks have used newspaper scraps and feathers to soften their nest. Tree bark and leaves are also known to be used in nesting.

Red-tailed Hawks will lay a clutch of two to four eggs in March or April, depending on climate. (A clutch is the collection of eggs, kind of like a "litter" in other species.) For Philadelphia's latitude, the eggs are likely to be laid in mid-March.

The female lays the eggs one at a time, approximately every other day. The number of eggs is related to the availability of food in the area, as a well-fed female is likely to lay more eggs.
What's Next?

Incubation of the clutch lasts for 28-35 days, which means we could have begun to see signs of hatching during the week of April 6. The female was most responsible for incubation, but the male substituted when the female needed to exercise or hunt. The nestlings began to hatch on Thursday, April 16.

About 43-45 days after hatching, the babies (known as nestlings) will begin to leave the nest to learn to fly and hunt. At 10 weeks, they will leave the nest for good.


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By: Anonymous: Junie () on Thursday, February 18 2010 @ 04:00 PM EST  
Anonymous: Junie

cam's up...I think there's been some nestorations' done, but no sightings' of hawks' Nodding yes





       
   
By: Anonymous: Junie () on Friday, February 19 2010 @ 10:08 AM EST  
Anonymous: Junie

cam at different angle...I hope they fix it.Nodding yes I seen hawk come into nest lay down, and wiggle down hard in nest bowl.
I got a pic as she stood up..and flew offSmile
Click on image to download





       
   
By: Castor (offline) on Friday, February 19 2010 @ 03:09 PM EST  
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Hello Junie, it looks great on buteo in this room,,,Grin



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By: Anonymous: Junie () on Saturday, February 20 2010 @ 09:13 AM EST  
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hi Castorwave I caught Ma & Pa nestorating nest, though looks like some plastic and brown bag has been added too.
Click on image to downloadClick on image to downloadClick on image to download





       
   
By: Castor (offline) on Saturday, February 20 2010 @ 04:55 PM EST  
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:blink:PLAYING WITH THE TRASH,,,
Good photos,,,



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By: Castor (offline) on Sunday, February 21 2010 @ 08:34 AM EST  
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Breakfast, a dove breeding,,



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By: Castor (offline) on Monday, February 22 2010 @ 02:03 PM EST  
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Good morning Franklin, I think sleeping in the nest,,,



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