Forum Index > Conservation  > Wildlife News
 Whale Activity in the News
 |  Printable Version
By: Pat B (offline) on Monday, November 08 2010 @ 01:49 PM EST (Read 5017 times)  
Pat B

This thread is to provide a place for you to post any news items on whale activity - or your own observations.

Try to include a picture - but always credit the photographer and give a link to the source article!
Or include your own photo of asny activity you witnessed yourself - and include date and time and place.

These postings will be copied over to the "Whales in the News" Topic in the website - to provide a referenced resource for the future!

You could also submit your own item - using this link!

Submit News Item



Forum

Status: offline

Registered: 04/13/07
Posts: 7918
Plymouth, England

Profile     PM
   
By: Pat B (offline) on Monday, November 08 2010 @ 01:50 PM EST  
Pat B

Reserved



Forum

Status: offline

Registered: 04/13/07
Posts: 7918
Plymouth, England

Profile     PM
   
By: Pat B (offline) on Sunday, December 26 2010 @ 10:04 AM EST  
Pat B

Blue whales visited in record numbers
Posted: 12/25/2010 08:32:42 PM PST
By Sandy Mazza

Giant blue whales congregated just off the South Bay shores this summer in record numbers.

The phenomenon reached its peak on Aug. 25, when whale watchers spotted 33 of the Earth's largest mammals off the Palos Verdes Peninsula at once - something not seen here before by watchers.

Snip

As many as 200 blue whales were seen here this summer, which excited researchers as there are only an estimated 2,000 living now in the Northern Pacific Ocean. They migrate from cooler waters in the summer to feed, to tropical areas in the winter to mate and breed.


Read the Whole Article



Forum

Status: offline

Registered: 04/13/07
Posts: 7918
Plymouth, England

Profile     PM
   
By: Pat B (offline) on Monday, February 21 2011 @ 07:13 PM EST  
Pat B

107 stranded whales die on Stewart Island

From the Southland Times - 21/02/2011


Click for larger view

A pod of 107 whales was found beached at Mason Bay on Stewart island by two tourists on Saturday.

Unfortunately, by the time the alarm was raised and help came, the whales were stranded high up on the beach with the tide just starting to recede.

It was decided to euthanise them as it would be another 12 hours before any attempt could be made to refloat them!

Read the Full Article here



Forum

Status: offline

Registered: 04/13/07
Posts: 7918
Plymouth, England

Profile     PM
   
By: Pat B (offline) on Thursday, June 09 2011 @ 05:50 PM EDT  
Pat B

'Largest' Fin whale gathering spotted in British waters

June 7th 2011

Scientists have described whale sightings off the Cornish coast as one of the "largest gatherings" of the species ever seen in British waters.

Researchers spotted 21 fin whales 50 to 70 miles offshore, feeding near the surface over 30 minutes.

The fin whale, the second largest animal on the planet, is a globally endangered species.

Dr Tom Brereton, research director from Marinelife, said it was an "incredibly rare event".


Fin whales seen by scientists 'lunge-feeding' near the surface of the water

Dr Brereton said that it's rare to see those numbers - 20 or more - especially here in British waters.
They were possibly chasing a dense mass of krill.


Read this exciting Report Here

Reference Article Here



Forum

Status: offline

Registered: 04/13/07
Posts: 7918
Plymouth, England

Profile     PM
   
By: Pat B (offline) on Wednesday, December 14 2011 @ 06:05 PM EST  
Pat B

Beluga whales trapped in ice floes of Bering Sea

By Lynn Herrmann
Dec 14, 2011
http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/316101

More than 100 Beluga whales are trapped between ice floes in the Chukotka region of Russia, with government officials seeking an icebreaker, as the whales are at risk of death from exhaustion, lack of food, and predators.
The Belugas are trapped in the Sinyavinsky Strait near the village of Yanrakynnot, just off the Bering Sea. They were discovered by fishermen who said the whales were concentrated in two small ice holes where, for now, they are able to breathe freely.
The government of the Chukotka Autonomous Region is seeking federal assistance in the form of an icebreaker to help with a rescue of the whales, CNN reports. Ice floes are increasing which may lead to rapid exhaustion and death by suffocation or starvation. The trapped whales are also at risk from predators such as polar bears and killer whales.
Beluga whales inhabit the Arctic Ocean and adjoining seas, are entirely arctic and subarctic, and are generally found in shallow coastal waters. Their world population is estimated between 60,000 to 80,000, according to Sea World.
Belugas are often trapped in the Arctic’s icy waters, but the phenomenon is usually undetected by people. The last recorded successful rescue of Belugas in the Chukotka region occurred in 1986, when an icebreaker helped in getting a pod of Belugas back into open water.
Known as “the shore of two oceans,” the Chukotka Autonomous Region is remotely located in extreme Northeast Russia and is the closest territory to the US, separated by the Bering Strait.


Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/3 ... z1gYKB4nTU



Forum

Status: offline

Registered: 04/13/07
Posts: 7918
Plymouth, England

Profile     PM
   
By: jkr (offline) on Thursday, December 22 2011 @ 06:50 AM EST  
jkr

New baby whale joins pod off Pacific coast

By Judith Lavoie, Victoria Times Colonist December 21, 2011


Click on image to download
The endangered southern resident killer whales have a new calf, bringing the population in the three pods up to 89 animals.
Photograph by: Handout


VICTORIA — Whale enthusiasts are celebrating the arrival of a colourful Christmas baby for the endangered southern resident killer whales.

The calf, with characteristic pinky-orange patches, was spotted Saturday in Puget Sound by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration researchers and the birth was confirmed Wednesday.

As the calf had fetal folds when the first photos were taken, it is likely it had been born only hours earlier.

More to the story: http://www.canada.com/technology/baby+w ... z1hGJiGoyP


Forum

Status: offline

Registered: 08/11/06
Posts: 14405
Beautiful B.C.

Profile Email   PM
   
By: elle (offline) on Thursday, December 22 2011 @ 02:30 PM EST  
elle

Click on image to download

A family of pilot whales that was likely to perish in a narrow channel in Bonavista Bay, N.L. has made it out. The six whales were at the end of a long run near Deer Island, on the northeastern coast of the province.Photograph by: Wayne Ledwell, Whale Release and Strandings


ST. JOHN'S — A family of pilot whales that was likely to perish in a narrow channel in Bonavista Bay, N.L. has made it out.


The six whales were at the end of a long run near Deer Island, on the northeastern coast of the province.


"They won't swim out once they go up these narrow entrances — pilot whales are really social, really sensitive to sound, and they hang together in groups and won't go anywhere if they all don't go," said Wayne Ledwell of Whale Release and Strandings, a non-profit organization that responds to whales that are entrapped or stranded on the shoreline.


The organization had been called in by a group of bird hunters who had spotted the whales on Monday.


"I knew they weren't going to get out of there if we weren't successful in getting them out, because it's going to freeze over."


If the whales had been sick and looking to beach, there may not have been anything he could do, Ledwell explained. But they weren't. It was a group of seemingly healthy animals — juveniles and adults — that Ledwell reckons had found their way into the channel by chasing herring or after being scared by killer whales, which had been spotted in the area last week.


Ledwell, along with fisheries officer Darren Poole, used a boat to chase the whales out. It's not the best way to deal with whales, Ledwell explained, but it was the only option.


It took about four hours to get the whales to leave.


"When they'd come up to the tickle, they'd turn around and go back. They didn't want to go through the narrow areas," he explained. "We had to keep after them. It was like rounding up cattle, except we couldn't see them most of the time. They'd turn around on us and go underneath.


"We kept at it, kept cutting them off, going behind them and cutting them off again, and we finally got them out. Once they were in the middle of the last tickle, it was open sea, and they were gone; they bolted it for the open ocean as fast as they could go."


Ledwell doesn't expect the whales to come back to the spot.


"If this was an animal that was found on a beach and we had pulled it back out again, or a single animal in this species, I would think they would come back, and most of the time they do," he explained. "In this case, they were healthy-looking, they weren't on a beach and didn't want to go on a beach, they were swimming around in the cove."

© Copyright (c) St. John's Telegram


We and the animals are in the same boat. We're one family, really. - Jane Goodall

Member since August 2006


Forum

Status: offline

Registered: 01/12/10
Posts: 11528
Victoria, BC, Canada

Profile Email   PM
   



 All times are EDT. The time is now 08:15 PM.
Normal Topic Normal Topic
Locked Topic Locked Topic
Sticky Topic Sticky Topic
New Post New Post
Sticky Topic W/ New Post Sticky Topic W/ New Post
Locked Topic W/ New Post Locked Topic W/ New Post
View Anonymous Posts 
Able to Post 
HTML Allowed 
Censored Content 

?

Please Donate

Please Donate!

Current & Ongoing Promotions

 

 

 

 

My Account





Sign up as a New User
Lost your password?