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By: Pat B (offline) on Thursday, October 14 2010 @ 05:16 PM EDT (Read 36835 times)  
Pat B

This topic is for us to post any interesting Wildlife News we see in our news.

Try to include a photo, if there is one - but remember to credit the photographer and the writer of the article!
And put in a link to refer back to the source.

These articles will then be copied into Wildlife News on the Website.
Hopefully this will be easier for members who are not yet familiar with the software in the Website!

There must be many Wildlife related news stories in your area/country, that deserve a wider audience.


If the story is to do with the killing of eagles - or the conservation of an animal - then the following links are the place to post those!

Eagle Killings

Conservation

Looking forward to seeing your articles! Grin




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By: Pat B (offline) on Friday, October 15 2010 @ 02:21 PM EDT  
Pat B

New species of fish discovered in ocean's deepest depths
By Hilary Duncanson
Friday, 15 October 2010

A new species has been discovered in a part of the ocean previously thought to be entirely free of fish, scientists said yesterday.

The new type of snailfish was found living at a depth of 7,000m in the Peru-Chile trench of the South East Pacific Ocean.

Mass groupings of cusk-eels and large crustacean scavengers were also discovered living at these depths for the first time, scientists said. The findings, in one of the deepest places on the planet, were made by a team of marine biologists from the University of Aberdeen and experts from Japan and New Zealand.

(click bigger)
The snailfish was found living at a depth of 7,000m in a trench in the South East Pacific Ocean, which was previously thought to be free of fish

The team took part in a three-week expedition, during which they used deep-sea imaging technology to take 6,000 pictures at depths between 4,500m and 8,000m within the trench.

The mission was the seventh to take place as part of HADEEP, a collaborative research project between the University of Aberdeen's Oceanlab and the University of Tokyo's Ocean Research Institute, supported by New Zealand's National Institute of Water and Atmospheric research (NIWA).

The University of Aberdeen said these latest discoveries helped shed new light on life in the depths of the Earth. Oceanlab's Dr Alan Jamieson, who led the expedition, said: "Our findings, which revealed diverse and abundant species at depths previously thought to be void of fish, will prompt a rethink into marine populations at extreme depths.

"This expedition was prompted by our findings in 2008 and 2009 off Japan and New Zealand where we discovered new species of snailfish known as Liparids inhabiting trenches... at depths of 7,000 metres with each trench hosting its own unique species of the fish.

"To test whether these species would be found in all trenches, we repeated our experiments on the other side of the Pacific Ocean off Peru and Chile, some 6,000 miles (9,656km) from our last observations. What we found was that indeed there was another unique species of snailfish living at 7,000 metres entirely new to science which had never been caught or seen before.

"A species of cusk-eel known as Ophidiids also gathered at our camera and began a feeding frenzy that lasted 22 hours the entire duration of the deployment. Further research needs to be conducted to decipher whether this is also an entirely new species of cusk-eel that we have discovered.

"Our investigations also revealed a species of crustacean scavengers known as amphipods which we previously did not know existed at these depths in such great numbers. These are large shrimp-like creatures of which one particular group, called Eurythenes, were generally far larger and occurred much deeper in this trench than has ever been found before."

Dr Toyonobu Fujii, a deep-sea fish expert from Aberdeen University, added: "How deep fish can live has long been an intriguing question and the results from this expedition have provided deeper insight into our understanding of the global distribution of fish in the oceans."

Article Source



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By: Pat B (offline) on Friday, October 22 2010 @ 09:14 AM EDT  
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Spiderlings to descend on Suffolk broads

The Dolomedes plantarius spiderlings were released into suitable dykes at Castle Marshes between Lowestoft and Beccles on Wednesday.


The 1,600 spiderlings were relased at Castle Marshes on Wednesday More than 1,000 young spiders from a hybrid species have been released into the Suffolk broads.


About 4mm, they are hybrids between species found in Sussex and Suffolk.

The 1,600 spiderlings were hand reared in the kitchen of project leader Dr Helen Smith, with the surplus reared at the John Innes Centre in Norwich.

Dr Smith said: "The hybrids bring the advantage of increased genetic variability to the new population.

"This... should give the new population at Castle Marshes the best potential to adapt to its surroundings and to cope with the impacts of climate change."

The project was organised by Natural England and Suffolk Wildlife Trust and was aided by a grant from the BBC Wildlife Fund.

Link to the source article

BBC Article on Raft Spiders



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By: birdofprey (offline) on Thursday, December 30 2010 @ 10:46 PM EST  
birdofprey

Last week there was a little lost bear cub foraging in backyards just a block or two from where I live!

Link to news article and photo

The poor little guy could not be captured by the Mounties (who always get their man but not their bear cubs Wink ), but later a conservation officer was able to get it and take it to the North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre. Smile


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By: Pat B (offline) on Wednesday, January 05 2011 @ 11:59 AM EST  
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40,000 'devil' crabs wash up on Kent coast after dying from hypothermia in freezing sea
By Daily Mail Reporter
Last updated at 11:49 AM on 5th January 2011

Thousands of dead crabs have washed up along the Kent coast, with environmental experts believing the cold weather in Britain is to blame.

The Velvet swimming crabs - also called devil crabs - are thought to be victims of Britain's coldest December in 120 years, which left sea temperatures much lower than average.

More than 40,000 of the crabs - Britain's largest swimming crab - are littering beaches around Thanet, along with smaller numbers of whelks, sponges and anemones.

Snip

Click for larger
Sad discovery: Dr Alasdair Bruce, one of the experts studying the dead crabs.

Crabs have been reported on beaches at Westbrook, Cliftonville and Kingsgate, while smaller numbers have been washed up between Broadstairs and Ramsgate.

Link to the full article with Photos



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By: birdofprey (offline) on Friday, January 07 2011 @ 12:02 AM EST  
birdofprey

Very sad about the crabs. Sad

More underweight bear cubs are in care on Vancouver Island. Sad Almost all the cubs weigh between 20 and 35 pounds. They should normally weigh between 60 and 80 pounds before going into hibernation. There are 6 cubs currently at the North island Wildlife Recovery Centre, and 2 who had to be euthanised.

Theories among biologists and conservation officers range from last year's failed berry crop, following a bumper crop the previous year that encouraged multiple births, to a lack of pink and chum salmon. :dunno:

Article by Judith Lavoie, Victoria Times-Colonist, Jan. 6 2011

Photos and article at: http://www.timescolonist.com/technology ... z1AK2ymEjV


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By: Anonymous: CAL04 () on Sunday, January 30 2011 @ 11:09 PM EST  
Anonymous: CAL04

From the "Los Angeles Times" today, January 30, 2011: "A wild eagle is perching above the cage of Olivia, the O.C. Zoo's 6-year old female."

Click on image to download
"Not much is known about the wild bald eagle that has set up camp at the Orange County Zoo, but its small size suggests it might be male. Experts note that nearby Santiago Creek offers a reliable food supply, while casual observers speculate that the bird may be looking for company. (Allen J. Schaben, Los Angeles Times / January 30, 2011)"

Article: tony.barboza@latimes.com
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me ... 4303.story

Photos:
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me ... otogallery

Video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch%3Ffeature= ... SYmBVjkYqs





       
   
By: Anonymous: CAL04 () on Tuesday, February 01 2011 @ 07:59 PM EST  
Anonymous: CAL04

Video and Story:
Zoo readies animals for freezing temperatures

Click on image to download

Credits: "News Channel 4 - Oklahoma City - Zoo readies animals for freezing temperatures"
Adam Mertz Reporting
KFOR
6:22 p.m. CST, January 31, 2011"





       
   



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