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By: MaryF (offline) on Tuesday, April 13 2010 @ 01:41 AM EDT  
MaryF

Great update on that eagle, Kay! I love happy endings.

The rehab center here in San Antonio where my story is from is so private that they aren't listed anywhere as to phone # or address. They used to be near my house and the airport but it has moved to somewhere out of town to the North of me. I had thought about volunteering or at least checking to see if they needed anything but can't contact them!! sigh sign



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By: country (offline) on Tuesday, April 13 2010 @ 09:42 AM EDT  
country

well here is a brief update to our eagles down here in Baytown, Tx was doing a little searching the other night and found some pics of the eagles and they are now proud parents to best i can tell by photos there are 2 babys that are growing pretty fast. i havent been out there in several weeks do to being exteremly busy drag racing and working hopefully get out in the next couple days to go see them. if i can find the link again i will post.


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By: Pat B (offline) on Sunday, April 25 2010 @ 12:57 PM EDT  
Pat B

Here is a CBC report on the Hancock eagle nests - and what it costs to put them on the WEB!
Report Here



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By: terrytvgal (offline) on Tuesday, May 04 2010 @ 02:26 AM EDT  
terrytvgal

Full Story here... Bald Eagles May Have to Eat Toxic Seals, Study Says

Ker Than

for National Geographic News

Published May 3, 2010

Bald eagle numbers are growing on California's Channel Islands (see map)—and that might not be entirely good news, a new study suggests.

That's because the iconic birds, which were wiped out on the islands in the 1960s, have returned to find that their traditional food sources have been greatly reduced.

To make ends meet, the predatory birds may be forced to scavenge on marine mammal carcasses, the blubber of which is still laced with DDT—the same pesticide that infamously led to the near extinction of bald eagles across the United States.

(Related: "Antarctic Melt Releasing DDT, Tainting Penguins."Wink

"Eagles are opportunistic, and as their population grows, they might switch their diets ... to include carrion from local sea lion colonies, which is a very abundant food source, for sure," said study co-author Seth Newsome, a biochemist at the Carnegie Institution for Science in Washington D.C.

The northern Channel Islands are home to some of the largest seal and sea lion rookeries in the United States, with populations in the tens and hundreds of thousands, Newsome added.

What's more, some conservationists fear that a bald eagle boom will lead to declines in some of the Channel Islands' other rare species, such as the island gray fox. (See a Channel Islands fox picture.)...


I came for the eagles, and stayed for the friends I made

Terry, Coquitlam BC


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By: MaryF (offline) on Tuesday, May 04 2010 @ 02:32 PM EDT  
MaryF

Good article, Terry. It does make you stop and think about the diet of the eagles on the Channel Island cams that we follow. AND it features the learned and great looking Dr. Sharpe as well! Left thumb up I'm going to post a link to the story over on the Channel Island nest thread. Cool



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By: MaryF (offline) on Monday, May 24 2010 @ 02:06 PM EDT  
MaryF

Click on image to download

I saw this short article in a Care2 newsletter that I received today and thought it was interesting. Care2 is a large and trusted information and action site.



Bald Eagle Population Taking Off in New York State

In 1975 only one pair of bald eagles was documented by the local government, and that pair did not have any babies. Flash ahead to the current day, and it could be that there are more bald eagles than ever.

In 2008, 573 were counted. This year, the count could be even higher. This number was quite an increase from the 51 breeding pairs and 71 young raised in 2000. Last year 173 breeding pairs raised 223 eaglets. Some of the eagles counted in New York migrated there from Canada. Many of the New York eagles live along the St. Lawrence, Hudson and Delaware rivers.

DDT and other pesticides in the food chain nearly wiped out bald eagles in New York. The fish that eagles ate to survive were contaminated with man-made chemicals and ingesting the chemicals caused eagles to produce infertile eggs. Because of the severe loss of wild eagles, the state of New York began a bald eagle restoration program in 1976. 198 nesting bald eagles were imported from other US states, mainly Alaska, over a thirteen year period.

Once breeding pairs began to produce offspring annually, the population began to grow and stabilize. Today the emphasis is on protecting the breed pairs and their nesting sites. The public can assist bald eagles and the bald eagle management program by reporting to authorities any harassment or assaults on bald eagles. Of course, harming bald eagles is illegal.

Image Credit: WKnight94



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By: JudyB (offline) on Thursday, June 24 2010 @ 04:38 PM EDT  
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Thanks to sunshinecoast for bringing this article to my attention.

Click on image to download


Local First Nations want to hunt eagles for ceremonial use


By Suzanne Fournier, The Province June 24, 2010 11:29 AM

First Nations leaders are demanding the right to “sustainably” harvest eagles for ceremonial use.

They will make their demand known Thursday, when National Chief Shawn Atleo of the Assembly of First Nations — along with three chiefs of B.C. communities targeted by government investigators over the sale of eagle parts — are honoured with eagle feather and cedar headdresses in downtown Vancouver.

“We were as outraged as the general public when we learned about massive eagle kills and dumping of carcasses, because eagles are highly significant in our culture,” Grand Chief Doug Kelly of the Sto:lo Tribal Council said Wednesday.

“But the B.C. Environment Ministry wasn’t interested in finding out who killed those birds. Instead they sent undercover operators in only to First Nations communities, to entrap our artisans in a mischievous sting.”

Kelly said native leaders want to “engage” the B.C. and federal governments in a “management and conservation” plan for eagles and other large birds with ceremonial First Nations significance, including swans and hawks.

Read more: http://www.theprovince.com/life/Local+F ... z0rnvlZdHH

I believe The Province is a major newspaper in British Columbia. I've also posted the story in our Wildlife News area - article.php/20100624154857997" rel="nofollow">link.

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By: Velma Flann (offline) on Friday, September 24 2010 @ 01:16 PM EDT  
Velma Flann

I saw an interesting story this morning about two Bald Eagles in P.E.I. who had their talons locked and could not free themselves. Wild life officials aided in the release.

Here is a link to the story on Wildlife News


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