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 Eagles in the News
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By: jkr (offline) on Thursday, February 11 2010 @ 10:57 AM EST  
jkr

country I found the article in your newspaper. Now that I've read the article it sounds as if seeing Bald Eagles in your area is a very rare event. You're very fortunate to witness this happening Smile and I hope the eagles remain in your area for years to come.



Eagles attract local audience

Click on image to download

By Travers La ville, Correspondent
Published January 26, 2010

Donna Dickerson’s curiosity was piqued when she saw cars lining the road along the route she drove to take her daughter, Taeler Brockman, to school. As she passed by last week, she noticed many of the bystanders had binoculars they were using to scan the nearby treetops.

“After four days, I finally stopped to ask what was going on,” Dickerson said. “They said, ‘Don’t you know? The eagles are here.’”

The two American bald eagles have taken up residency in the woods off Tri-City Beach Road, across the street from Evergreen Point Golf Course. Bird watchers and spectators like Dickerson are flocking to the location to catch a glimpse of the adult birds.

Dickerson brought her daughter and a friend, Rubi Rodriguez, to the location Saturday. The girls attend Horace Mann Junior High School together and have discussed the birds in class.

“It’s fascinating,” Rodriguez said. “I’ve read about birds like this in school, but I’ve never seen anything like this up close.”

Brockman said her science class recently discussed the origins of the eagles.

“My teacher said the birds were Mexican Eagles,” Brockman said. “The birdwatchers said they were bald eagles.”

Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge manager Tim Cooper said the birds could have picked the nesting site because of its proximity to water.

“Eagles typically look for robust, significant trees when picking a place to nest,” Cooper said.

He said eagles like having a good view from the nest, as it is important to watch for other eagles that might encroach on their territory and to keep an eye on their food sources.

The refuge manager said the national bird garners a lot of interest from the public, but he warned spectators to keep a healthy distance.

“Onlookers should not approach the tree and should only observe with cameras and binoculars,” he said. “Disturbing the area below the tree could change the dynamic of the nesting period and be harmful to the birds.”

News article http://baytownsun.com/story/49365/


~Judy~


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By: country (offline) on Thursday, February 11 2010 @ 03:57 PM EST  
country

Yes it is a rare for eagles to nest in our area but i have heard in the past 20 or so years of hunting the marsh of people spotting American Bald Eagles along the Trinity River which is about a 15-20 miles from where these eagles are at now. I just wish we had a better eco system in this area due to all the chemical plants and pollution that they put out. The area that these eagles are in and will feed over our bays and tributaries are full of mercury and other harmful stuff that the public has been told do not eat anymore than 8 oz of fish a month. And the eagles are setting right in the middle of this area. All the information below could and will effect the birds i believe but im not an expert on this but if they tells us not to eat it then i dought it is very good for the eagles and there soon to hatch babys.

http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/publication ... tion_bans/<br />

Houston/Galveston Area

Galveston Bay including Chocolate Bay, East Bay, West Bay, Trinity Bay and contiguous waters
Chemicals of Concern: Dioxin and Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)

For all catfish species and spotted seatrout, adults should limit consumption to no more than one, 8-ounce meal per month.
Women who are nursing, pregnant, or who may become pregnant and children should not consume catfish or spotted seatrout from these waters.

Houston Ship Channel upstream of the Lynchburg Ferry crossing and all contiguous water including the San Jacinto River below U.S. Highway 90 bridge
Chemicals of Concern: Dioxin, Organochlorine pesticides, Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)

For all species of fish and blue crabs, adults should limit consumption to no more than one, 8-ounce meal per month.
Women of child-bearing age and children under 12 should not consume any fish or blue crabs from this area.

Houston Ship Channel downstream of the Lynchburg Ferry crossing and all contiguous waters including Upper Galveston Bay north of a line drawn from Red Bluff Point to Five Mile cut Marker to Houston Point
Chemicals of Concern: Dioxin and Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)

For spotted seatrout, blue crabs and all catfish species, adults should limit consumption to no more than one, 8-ounce meal per month.
Children under 12 and women of childbearing age should not consume spotted seatrout, blue crabs, or any catfish species from this area.


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By: soph9 (offline) on Monday, February 15 2010 @ 11:53 PM EST  
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UPDATE about the chick that was going to be fostered in Kissimmee.....Left thumb upNEWs...please read! Plus there is a video!

http://www.tampabay.com/news/environmen ... st/1073519


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By: MaryF (offline) on Tuesday, February 16 2010 @ 01:25 AM EST  
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Puzzled Soph...Does that link open for you? I have tried it several times and can't get it.Chin Thanks for finding that story, Soph!!!

ETA...Thank You PEB for fixing the link!

Here is another link to the same story but from the Audobon Society. It was good to see Lynda White who we knew from the Tesoro, Florida nest in the video!!


http://audubonoffloridanews.org/



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By: JudyB (offline) on Tuesday, February 16 2010 @ 06:30 PM EST  
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Thanks for finding that, soph! Great news! Grin

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By: Anonymous: Frog_Barf () on Monday, February 22 2010 @ 04:10 PM EST  
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By: soph9 (offline) on Tuesday, February 23 2010 @ 11:46 PM EST  
soph9

Another man found guilty for slaying birds of prey but trying to use the Church as a reason to allow him to kill eagles and hawks! UGH!

http://www.siouxcityjournal.com/news/lo ... 002e0.html


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By: MaryF (offline) on Thursday, February 25 2010 @ 02:17 PM EST  
MaryF

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Desert Nesting Bald Eagles Denied Federal Protection


In a devastating blow to eagles in the Southwest, today the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officially announced that desert nesting bald eagles in Arizona's Sonoran desert aren't "significant" enough to deserve Endangered Species Act protection. When bald eagles nationwide were declared recovered in 2007 and removed from the endangered species list, unfortunately desert nesting bald eagles were also removed -- robbed of protections even though they're still under dire threat from development, dams, stream dewatering, grazing, ORVs, and other activities. No recognized bald eagle expert agreed with the 2007 removal of protections from these desert eagles, and no expert agrees with today's decision.

The Center for Biological Diversity has been campaigning to earn the desert eagles -- genetically distinct from bald eagles nationwide -- their own much-needed Endangered Species Act status since 2004, and we won't let them slip through the cracks now.

Check out our press release and learn more about our work for the desert nesting bald eagle.




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